2020 Honors Costa Rica

2020 Honors Costa Rica

Honors Costa Rica 2020

Land Use Issues in Rainforest Conservation

Overview

Location: Costa Rica: Puntarenas (Osa Peninsula), Guanacaste (Liberia, Tilaran, Arenal), Alajuela (Monteverde), Limon (Cahuita, Indigenous villages of the BriBri), Cartago (Turrialba)

Dates: Summer B Term: July 23 – Aug. 22, 2020

 

Course Credits Credit Type
HONORS 382/BIOL 496: Land Use Policy in Costa Rica 5 Honors Interdisciplinary  (NW/I&S) “W”
HONORS 213/BIOL 493: Independent Study 5 Honors Science  (NW/I&S), “W”
HONORS 382: Spring Quarter Prep Seminar 2 Honors elective, does not count toward core requirements. VLPA, “W”

Information Sessions

  • 12/4/19 @ 9:30 am Honors Library (MGH 211)
  • 12/4/19 @ 9:30 am Honors Library (MGH 211)
  • 1/10/20 @ 1:30 pm MGH 206
  • 1/14/20 @ 9:30 am Hitchcock Hall (HCK) 312
  • 1/20/20 @ 4 pm LSB 301
  • 1/24/20 @ 2 pm LBD 301

About the Program

About the Program

Designed to expose students to many of the concerns that must be addressed in public policy regarding conservation and sustainable land use, both locally and at a national scale, in a country renown for its biodiversity and its extensive system of public and private reserves. Students will gain real-world understanding of ecological research, sustainable agriculture, ecotourism development, and the complexity of conservation issues in a field setting. Students will learn about land management practices and will talk with Costa Ricans about their livelihood and community. We will travel together to several national parks, private reserves, and research institutes within Costa Rica. We’ll have a couple of “days off”, but the entire group will be on the same schedule, staying together in field stations and small hotels, sharing charter bus rides and most meals (provided). Individual students will keep a journal, give oral presentations on natural history and tropical ecology, and prepare written briefs as we explore different points of view. Student teams will focus on specific issues and document, analyze and communicate their results in a final presentation.

Program components include:

1) Introduction to Costa Rica and tropical forests at Serena Field Station in Corcovado National Park on the Osa peninsula.

2) Tour country by bus:

  • Southwest coastal slopes
  • the lowlands/grazing lands of Guanacaste
  • the dry tropical forest of Santa Rosa
  • Rincon volcanos; and
  • Arenal the Caribbean lowland coast of Cahuita

Toucan

 

3) Course work and farm/coffee plantation visits

4) Monteverde Cloud forest and independent project work/presentation

Students will maintain a journal throughout the program, both to log events and learning experiences and to record external and internal observations.

The group will travel together to field stations and small hotels, sharing charter bus rides and most meals (provided). As the program moves about the country, students will prepare each other for upcoming experiences with small presentations concerning geography, economics, sociology, and civics.

Housing

Students are housed in both rural and urban settings. In San Jose the group is housed  at a hotel known for its quality. The group will then spend a week in a rural jungle setting at a  field camp / research facility. The remainder of the program housing is spent at an NGO Field station (CATIE).

All lodging has security guards, lockable rooms, and dining facilities. Program director stays in the same facility.

Program Credit / Course Description

HONORS 382/BIOL 496: Land Use Policy in Costa Rica, 5 credits (NW/I&S, “W”)

Instructor: Michael Kennedy

This course is designed to expose students to many of the concerns that must be addressed in public policy regarding conservation and sustainable land use, both locally and at a national scale, in a country renown for its biodiversity and its extensive system of public and private reserves. Students will gain real- world understanding of ecological research, sustainable agriculture, ecotourism development, and the complexity of conservation issues in a field setting. Students will learn about land management practices and will talk with Costa Ricans about their livelihood and Rainforest Frogcommunity.

 

HONORS 213/BIOL 493: Independent Study, 5 credits (NW/I&S)

Instructor: Michael Kennedy and Moon Draper

Each student will arrive in Costa Rica prepared to discuss three topics: a particular organism likely to be seen, the history and general description for one of the stops, and a current socio-economic issue. Each stop will involve a “What would you guess?” assignment before learning about the local topic, and a follow up: “What did you learn?” assignment. There are two themes throughout the course: the notion that for each issue there are many stakeholders to consider and that quite often (almost always) a compromise is needed to address the issue. Students will gather data in the form of observations, interviews, experiences, and research to formulate suggestions for how the issue might be resolved. In the past, these issues have involved water usage, labour utilisation in the coffee agriculture and the evolving ecotourism trade (Costa Rica’s largest export).

Individual students will keep a journal, give oral presentations on natural history and tropical ecology, and prepare written briefs as we explore different points of view. Student teams will focus on specific issues and document, analyze and communicate their results in a final presentation.

HONORS 382: Spring Quarter Prep Seminar, 2 credits. Note: required of all program participants (VLP, “W”).  Honors elective credit category-does not count toward Honors core)

Seminar details pending.

Program Leadership

Program Leadership

Dr. Michael L Kennedy, Biology Department

Kennedy is a Senior Lecturer in the Biology Department. He received his BS in Zoology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, his MS in Biology from Central Washington University, and his Ph.D. in Physiology/Biochemistry from Arizona State University. Kennedy was a postdoctoral student in Case Western Medical School. He has been at the University of Washington since 2002 originally employed in the School of Nursing and then moving to the undergraduate neurobiology program in December of that year. Kennedy is involved in educational research. His previous research included ecology, as well as vertebrate, insect, and molecular physiology.

Dr. Moon Draper, Biology Department

Draper is a Senior Lecturer in the Biology Department and a natural sciences educator. He received his PhD in Biology at the University of Texas and has led students to Costa Rica through the University of Texas at Austin and Dr. Draper has worked with students, researchers, and travelers in Costa Rica since 1998. He teaches courses for UW Honors including “Medical Ethics”.

Program Expenses

The costs listed include tuition via concurrent enrollment fee and all housing and excursions.

Students are responsible for most meals, airfare, study abroad fee, and insurance.

Program fee: $4,800

UW concurrent enrollment fee: $450

Average Airplane Ticket: $700

Daily out of pocket food costs (approx): $20

Payment Schedule:

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
Non-Refundable UW Study Abroad Fee $450  TBA
Program Fee Balance $4,800  TBA
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $5,250

Making the program affordable

The Honors Program is passionate about study abroad and the incredible impact it can have on a student’s life. Don’t assume you can’t afford to study outside of the U.S. Here are resources to help you get started on your global adventures!

Honors Program Scholarships

The Honors Program offers a number of scholarships for current Honors Program students. These scholarship funds may be used for UW approved study abroad programs or exchanges. Students may apply beginning in late January (deadline is March 30).

Study Abroad Scholarships at UW

Every student who applies and is accepted to a study abroad program is considered for a scholarship. Scholarship awards are dependent on need and students may be awarded up to $4,000. Visit the study abroad office in 459 Schmitz Hall to learn more or click here. Students may also email goglobal@uw.edu for an advising appointment.

There are several outside resources for study abroad scholarships. Visit the UW’s Study Abroad Scholarship page for more information on scholarship support as well as information about GET funds and how you may apply the GET to your study abroad costs.

Using Financial Aid for Study Abroad

You may find more information about using your existing financial aid for study abroad on the Study Abroad Office’s Financial Aid webpage.  In general, all financial aid awarded may be used to support study abroad. Exceptions to this include tuition waivers, work-study awards, or scholarships that are specific about using the award for tuition (although there may be flexibility with some scholarships, please check with the financial aid office). Tuition waivers and work-study are never allowed for study abroad.

Revision of Need

You may also turn in a “Revision of Need” form with the Financial Aid Office if you have a FAFSA on file.  Once you are accepted to a study abroad program, visit the Study Abroad Office to obtain a budget for your study abroad program then complete the Revision Request and turn in both the budget and the revision request to the Office of Student Financial Aid in Schmitz Hall.

Visit the Financial Aid Study Abroad Funding Website for more information about applying for Summer quarter financial aid and for information about Exploration Seminar financial aid timeline (different than A or B term financial aid disbursement timeline).

Application Process

This program is open to students in the Honors Program and also students across campus. The program is focused on recruiting a diverse group of students.

Acceptance into the program is decided based on application materials, interviews, and student’s demonstrated motivation to challenge themselves intellectually across academic disciplines and cultures and to work collaboratively in small groups.

There are no prerequisites or language requirements. Students will do some light hiking and lots of walking.

APPLY NOW

Deadline: January 31, 2020