Honors Course Archive

Course Archive for Spring 2022

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

Honors Arts & Humanities (3)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 212 A: Modern Japan Through Cinema (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 212 A: Modern Japan Through Cinema (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 15310 (View UW registration info »)

Edward (Ted) Mack (Asian Languages and Literature)
Office: Gowen 248, Box 353521
Phone: 206-543-4356
Email: tmack@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

This course will be an introduction to modern Japan through films, in which we will use a wide variety of twentieth-century works to discuss an array of topics. Not only will we be viewing films in a variety of genres — documentary, drama, comedy, historical pieces, the avant-garde, gangster films, and animation — we will also be discussing topics ranging from the nature of art to the moral questions of nuclear modernity. Although our discussions will be sensitive to the specific nature of film as an expressive medium, we will consider the topics of art, history, society, war, propaganda, tradition, and morality.

HONORS 212 B: What Does Art Do?: Understanding Caribbean and Gulf Coast Embodied Oral History and Performing Arts Expressions through the Humanities (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 212 B: What Does Art Do?: Understanding Caribbean and Gulf Coast Embodied Oral History and Performing Arts Expressions through the Humanities (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 15311 (View UW registration info »)

Nina Müller-Schwarze (Anthropology)
Email: nmullers@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course will guide students in the skill of interpretation, by presenting performance arts emerging and that have emerged from the Gulf Coast and the Caribbean.

We will take a perspective that locates the past and future in the present, to better understand and convey the immediacies and embodiments of performing arts. Understanding performance art as oral history in its broadest definition will provide students with entry into how people express and embody historical experiences, engage in arts as activism, compose music within and despite inequalities, live with hurricanes, and contribute to widely known culinary practices.

Students will engage with examples of specific performing arts from many genres through music recordings, representations of dance, theater and Carnival performances, literature, film, storytelling, foodways, and representations of funerary practices and other expressions.

Arts will instigate our interpretations within interdisciplinary humanities frameworks to discuss race, experiences of history, aesthetics, religious studies, what art does, folklore studies, ethnomusicology and cultural anthropology. We will reflect on artistic expressions that travel beyond a cultural or geographical area, and on how some producers thereof often embody and make place.

Students will be asked to have fun, to actively participate, and to regularly produce their own syntheses of humanities theoretical frames with interpretations of Gulf Coast and Caribbean artistic expressions, including in a digital storytelling project.

HONORS 212 C: (Near)/Middle East Illustrated: Representations of Place, Culture and Society in Comics, Graphic Novels, Animation and Computer Games (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 212 C: (Near)/Middle East Illustrated: Representations of Place, Culture and Society in Comics, Graphic Novels, Animation and Computer Games (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 15312 (View UW registration info »)

Selim Kuru (Near East Language and Literature)
Office: Denny 220F, Box 353120
Phone: 206-543-4959
Email: selims@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

Through a variety of reading material, with a focus on a set of graphic novels, “(Near)/Middle East Illustrated” discusses verbal and visual expressions in order to represent Near and Middle East.

The course develops an understanding of imagined/promoted diversity through study of graphic novels and argues that diversity in the region is much more complicated. As students think about and discuss Orientalism, stock imagery, reporting vs. talking, facts vs. functions through short reading assignments, they will learn about history and today of the Near and Middle Eastern cultures.

Through visual depictions of most commonly discussed issues in the form of graphic novels in the region, students will be encouraged to incorporate relevant video games and anime in their projects or portfolio assignments.

Honors Science (3)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 222 A: Pain (NSc, W)

HONORS 222 A: Pain (NSc, W)

SLN 15313 (View UW registration info »)

John Loeser (Neurological Surgery; Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine)
Phone: 206-499-1408
Email: jdloeser@uw.edu
Jonathan Mayer (Epidemiology; Geography)
Phone: 206-543-7110
Email: jmayer@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Course will be offered in hybrid format. For more detailed information contact instructors.

This seminar course will utilize a flipped classroom model to investigate all aspects of pain; from the anatomy and physiology and psychology that create this common complaint, to the sociology, history, ethics, legal and medical issues that are associated with pain. This course does not presuppose any educational background and is open to students in any major.

HONORS 222 B: Artificial Intelligence Meets Society (NSc, W)

HONORS 222 B: Artificial Intelligence Meets Society (NSc, W)

SLN 15314 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Freeman (Physics)
Email: rrfree@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

This course has several components/goals: 1. A systematic review of the state of A.I. and the areas of our society and economy which are currently most affected by A.I.; 2. Deeper investigations into the effects, currently and in the near future, of specific applications of A.I. with a goal of understanding the technology sufficiently to make realistic projections as to its eventual impact.; 3. Understanding the existential challenges of A.I. to what it means to be human in contrast to machines, machines that may be able to do everything a human does. ; 4. Understand the mechanisms of machine learning and contrast them with human learning. The course has: 1. Extensive reading of current literature and media; 2. Many short essays on specific examples of advances in A.I.; 3. Several presentations, both within a group as well as individually, 4. A term paper and presentation in which the students are challenged to put advances in A.I. into the perspective of where our culture and society are going.

HONORS 222 C: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Science and society in a changing climate (NSc, W)

HONORS 222 C: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Science and society in a changing climate (NSc, W)

SLN 15315 (View UW registration info »)

Michelle Koutnik (Earth and Space Sciences)
Phone: 206-221-5041
Email: mkoutnik@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 8 students

Honors Credit Type

In this course students will read and think about Arctic and Antarctic ice loss due to climate change and then distill these scientific articles, reports, films, or books into pieces of writing for non-scientists. This is a critical practice for scientists, but also for anyone who wants to write for the public and communicate broadly. Effective communication of science is vital to society. We all need to understand the implications of declines in snowpack, coastal erosion, Arctic sea-ice loss, Greenland ice melting and instability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The goal of this course is for students to gain experience writing in styles read by the public and on scientific topics that matter to everyone. Following the model of the Calderwood seminars, students will read, write, edit, and share perspectives about ice and climate change.

This is offered jointly through Honors and Earth and Space Sciences (ESS option is not limited to Honors students).

Juniors and seniors preferred, interested sophomores should contact instructor; contact instructor to be put on waitlist if course is full

Students from majors and minors in the College of the Environment will be able to apply their scientific background to this process, but all motivated students are eligible to enroll.

Honors Social Sciences (4)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 232 A: Multisector Collaboration for Societal Change (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 232 A: Multisector Collaboration for Societal Change (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15316 (View UW registration info »)

Kirsten Foot (Communication)
Office: 102 Communications Bldg, Box 353740
Phone: 543-4837
Email: kfoot@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

In today’s world organizations in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors must interact well for the sake of their own organization and societal needs, but they face many challenges in doing so. Students in HONORS 232:Multisector Collaboration for Societal Change will have the opportunity to explore the dynamics of interorganizational, multisector collaboration in a discussion-based seminar. Students will participate in discussions, develop communication strategies for interorganizational interactions, and analyze real-world instances of multisector collaboration.

The centerpiece of the course is a 5-week simulation in which each student has a role in a (mock) multisector community task force– situated in a fictional mountain town– that negotiates the creation of a proactive, wildfire mitigation plan. Through the simulation, students will apply knowledge gained from course readings, and develop skills in assessing other stakeholders’ needs and motives, building alliances, communicating constructively through disagreements, and developing multilateral agreements for the collective good.

Because this is a synchronous discussion-based seminar, participation in the discussions is essential to succeeding in this course. There will be no lectures, and class discussions will not be recorded. The technology in the classroom does not support simultaneous interaction between in-person and remote students, so it will not be possible for individual students to participate remotely.

 

HONORS 232 B: Improving Population Health through Social Entrepreneurship (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 232 B: Improving Population Health through Social Entrepreneurship (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15317 (View UW registration info »)

Akhtar Badshah (Evans School of Public Policy; UW Bothell Business)
Email: akhtarb@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

Total enrollment is 35, however 7 seats are reserved for students in Public Health.

The course will offer students a fundamental understanding of the process of social innovation, and the role that social enterprises can play in addressing population health challenges. Through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, case studies and a team project, students will learn how organizations can advance work that has a positive societal impact while also remaining financially sustainable.

HONORS 232 C: The Ecology of Urban Seattle (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 232 C: The Ecology of Urban Seattle (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15318 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Conlin (Urban Design and Planning)
Email: richardbyrdconlin@gmail.com

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

The Ecology of Urban Seattle examines social, design, political, and environmental factors that promote healthy urban neighborhoods and the integration of urban communities and ecological realities. We will use these interactions to gain a deeper awareness of how these systems function in relationship to each other, to social and economic diversity, and to growth management and climate change. We will use a Race and Social Justice (RSJ) screen as a key element in evaluating how communities are shaped.

Cities function as a place where human communities come together to work, live, and interact. They also exist in a specific social, political, and ecological context, including the relationship between development and the environment, the interaction of human habitation and natural systems, and the relationship of human activities to the health of diverse cultures and the long-term viability of the local and global climate.

This class tells the story of the emerging urban paradigm built around resilience and sustainability, along with the social context through which that has evolved and can evolve in the future. Participants will study four communities, reviewing their history and ecological context, and examining the evolution of neighborhood development. The instructor will lead the class through an RSJ review of each community, beginning with an introduction to the technique and presentation on the initial neighborhood, and leading to a student paper on the fourth neighborhood in which each student will apply the RSJ screen.

HONORS 232 D: Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 232 D: Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15319 (View UW registration info »)

Velma Veloria (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: velorv@uw.edu
Connie So (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: ccso@uw.edu
Sutapa Basu (GWSS)
Email: sbasu@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 10 students

Honors Credit Type

The Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility examines the root causes of the human trafficking industry and analysizes possible strategies to prevent and minimize the trade. Course highlights includes essays, speakers and films on Forced Migration & Labor Rights, International Trade Agreements, Human Rights, Public Health, How to Improve Survivor Services, Ethical Sourcing & Sustainable Development, and Humanizing the Impacts of Human Trafficking.

Honors Interdisciplinary (6)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Honors Electives requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Inquiry designation.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Intersectionality, Covid-19, and the Truths Revealed (C, DIV)

HONORS 345 A: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Intersectionality, Covid-19, and the Truths Revealed (C, DIV)

SLN 15320 (View UW registration info »)

Deirdre Raynor
Email: draynor@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

Time listed on Time Schedule is incorrect. Course will meet from 9:30am-12:20pm, on Tuesdays.

Course will be offered in hybrid format. For more detailed information contact instructors.

This course focuses on what the Covid 19 pandemic revealed about the deep roots of systemic racism, healthcare disparity, and the social determinants of health. We will examine these important topics through the lens of scholars, journalists, artists, and activists who foreground social justice in their work. We will examine what was revealed about inequities in our society as a result of the pandemic and how the pandemic exacerbated and has led to a call for substantive action in addressing social isolation, racial strife, economic insecurity, and health disparities, especially as these issues impact the most vulnerable individuals in our society. The course is designed to empower your voices as you work with each other to develop public writing skills and an understanding of how public writing can help explain and influence our perspectives on crucial social justice issues of our time.

HONORS 391 A: Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

HONORS 391 A: Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

SLN 15321 (View UW registration info »)

Robert Pavia (School of Marine and Environmental Affairs)
Office: 3707 Brooklyn Avenue NE, Box 359485
Phone: 425-502-5243
Email: bobpavia@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

This course explores the science of climate change in the context of social and political constraints. It further explores the role of art and activism in communicating climate impacts and forcing change. Students will gain knowledge of key atmospheric and ocean science principles along with the role of science and uncertainty in social change and apply them to the climate crisis in the context of Arctic nations and peoples.

We will use climate science to explore how scientists, artists and musicians connect climate science to emotional engagement and activism. Climate change has social justice ramifications for communities and nations, as well as the scientists doing research. In studying climate change, students will develop skills for critically evaluating the popular portrayal of scientific concepts and their role in policy debates as a way to gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of developing sustainable and just adaptations to the climate crisis.

The course will rely on lectures from the instructor and others with first-hand experience to convey general principles and key aspects of climate change science. Throughout the course, students will be expected to engage in critical examination of lectures and readings through peer-to-peer discussions, small group work, and writing assignments. There will be a group assignment where students will apply knowledge and skills gained in the class to examine the climate crisis in the context of the Arctic.

HONORS 391 B: Visions of the land: Wilderness and shifting cultural landscapes of the Pacific Northwest (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 391 B: Visions of the land: Wilderness and shifting cultural landscapes of the Pacific Northwest (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 21281 (View UW registration info »)

Timothy Billo (Program on the Environment)
Phone: 206-407-4056
Email: timbillo@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course examines cultural visions of the local landscape through time. We will start with visions of the pre-European landscape, both from the perspective of Native Americans, and early European explorers who kept detailed journals and sketches. We will then focus on the origins and philosophy of our regional wilderness preservation movement (juxtaposed against a separate vision of resource extraction), a mainstay of American conservation that was in large part responsible for preserving the iconic landscapes that continue to make our burgeoning region such a desirable place to live. We will spend time critically examining wilderness as both a concept and a place, paying special attention to the human/nature divide, and a number of narratives around equity, privilege, and cultural marginalization that stem from the institution of wilderness. We will ask whether wilderness has been a successful conservation framework, who benefits from wilderness as an institution, and what role wilderness (or a modified vision of the natural landscape) will play for the people of our region going forward. By understanding the historical tensions and frameworks that define our regional landscape, we will be able to shed light on current land-use controversies, as well as identify new themes that are unique to our time. The course will draw readings from a variety of sources and disciplines including history, art history, historical journals, nature writing, biology, psychology, current events, and recently published editorials, and will pay special attention to underrepresented and historically marginalized cultures and groups. There will be one campus-based walking field trip, and a possible optional field trip further afield. Your grade will be based on contributions to discussion, a creative research-based project and presentation, and one essay.

HONORS 394 A: Ways of Meaning (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 A: Ways of Meaning (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15322 (View UW registration info »)

Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: Padelford A217, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-7691
Email: dziwirek@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

There will be 55 students total in this course (25 Honors/30 Slavic)

The key questions this course addresses are How do people talk to each other in different languages? Does the language we speak determine who we are? What is the relationship between language and thought, culture, national identity? We consider crosslinguistic differences and similarities with respect to conceptualizations of Moral Concepts, Friendship and Love, Freedom, Homeland, Politeness and Rudeness and Gender. Students are required to write 2 commentaries and a final term paper. Honors students are expected to write a longer, more in-depth final paper and do one additional commentary in which they reflect on universal vs. culture-specific aspects of language and how their understanding has changed during the course.

HONORS 394 B: Feminism in the Borderlands (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 B: Feminism in the Borderlands (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15323 (View UW registration info »)

Michelle Habell-Pallán (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies)
Office: PDL B110 T, Box 354380
Phone: (206) 543-6981
Email: mhabellp@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

Course will be offered in hybrid format. For more detailed information contact instructors.

This undergraduate seminar examines the particular forms in which Chicana feminist theoretical practices in the art of solidarity are embodied, including theoretical texts, poetry, music, and other creative works. Seminar considers how Chicana feminist theory has transformed and been transformed by intellectual, poetic, and aesthetic traditions as it moves throughout the U.S. borderlands and beyond. Each seminar meeting consists of a brief lecture, discussion break-out groups, a mid-way break, and a viewing/listening to relevant film, media or audio texts or assignment workshop. It is linked to the 2021 Plurifeminisms Against Extractivism: Art/Law across Abiayala.

HONORS 394 C: Community Inclusion and Equity in the Changing Public Realm (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 C: Community Inclusion and Equity in the Changing Public Realm (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15324 (View UW registration info »)

Ariana Cantu (Social Work)
Phone: 206-685-7682
Email: cantua@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Utilizing a framework of social justice, inclusion and equity, this course examines the underpinnings of urban place making/place-keeping in local communities. The course will bring together small interdisciplinary teams of students from the fields of social work, design + planning and Honors to conduct place based research and create digital documentation of their findings. Several site visits led by community organizations will help to connect students to contemporary challenges faced in both fields. This course will demonstrate how to communicate research and recommendations using a hands on, project based approach. This course seeks to unpack and examine neighborhood change in the present context to support collaborative equity and inclusion efforts in Seattle and King County.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15328 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum (SSc)

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum (SSc)

SLN 15329 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

Honors Electives (9)

Any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Honors Electives requirement. You will earn Areas of Inquiry credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 442 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

BIOC 442 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

SLN 11258 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 16 students

Honors Credit Type

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 GPA in either BIOC 440 or 450

Register for lecture and Honors section (AC)
CONTACT ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU TO ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 165: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 165: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12103 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 48 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.2 in CHEM 155

Introduction to systematic inorganic chemistry: representative elements, metals, and nonmetals. Includes coordination complexes, geochemistry, and metallurgy. Additional material on environmental applications of basic chemistry presented. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 162, CHEM 165 (5 credits); CHEM 165, CHEM 312 (5 credits).

CHEM 337: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 337: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12213 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 50 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.2 in CHEM 336.

Chemistry majors and other students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Biomolecules. Introduction to membranes, enzyme mechanisms, prosthetic groups, macromolecular conformations, and supramolecular architecture. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following courses: CHEM 239, CHEM 337.

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I (NSc)

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I (NSc)

SLN 12891 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4 + 1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 Honors section (HA)

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 142 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

See CSE Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390 H.

Contact CSE advising (ugrad-advisor@cs.washington.edu) for add code

CSE 142 will cover basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects. The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

CSE 143 / CSE 390: Computer Programming II (NSc)

CSE 143 / CSE 390: Computer Programming II (NSc)

SLN 12892 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5 + 1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

To earn Honors credit, students must register for and complete ALL of the following:

Register for CSE 143 lecture A or B AND a corresponding CSE 143 section
Register for CSE 390 H lecture AND corresponding CSE 390 HB section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 143 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

(See Time Schedule/MyPlan for course day, time and SLN for both CSE 143 and CSE 390)

CSE 143 is a continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. 

The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

ENGL 182 G: Composition: Multimodal (C)

ENGL 182 G: Composition: Multimodal (C)

SLN 14107 (View UW registration info »)

MiSun Bishop (English)
Email: misungb@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Counts for Honors "Additional Any" and UW Composition Requirement
Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

email uwhonors@uw.edu to request add code

English 182 focuses on teaching strategies and skills for effective writing and argument that are required of traditional academic genres, such as the research essay, while also expanding the skills for composing in multimodal genres that our increasingly digital and media saturated world demands.

Section G is an Honors discussion driven class with minimal lecturing and grounded in a disability studies analytic.  Students will reflect on their own growth as scholars and their learning process as an evolving product. 

 

Honors students will write longer reflective papers with emphasis on metacognitive critical takeaways.

 

 

 

MATH 136 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

MATH 136 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

SLN 16936 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department only. Contact: advising@math.washington.edu

Students must have completed Honors MATH 135.

Sequence covers the material of 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. Third quarter of the first year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May not receive credit for both 126 and 136. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 336: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

MATH 336: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

SLN 16998 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 45 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math department.

Prereq: Minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 335

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Third quarter of the second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 143: Honors Waves, Light and Heat (NSc)

PHYS 143: Honors Waves, Light and Heat (NSc)

SLN 19027 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 44 students

Honors Credit Type

If you have completed either PHYS 121 or PHYS 122 or have transfer credit (including AP credit) for those courses, and you think you are prepared and would like the challenge to take the next course in the sequence in the honors sequence, you should contact the instructor. Based on a discussion with the instructor of your preparedness, the instructor will help you determine what is required to ensure that you succeed in the honors sequence and will determine if the prerequisite should be waived.

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION AND ASSOCIATED QUIZ SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

See Physics department for more information and review their Honors Physics 142 and the Honors Physics overview pages:
https://phys.washington.edu/courses/2021/winter/phys/142a
https://phys.washington.edu/141-142-143-courses

Addresses same material as PHYS 123 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 116, PHYS 119, PHYS 123, and PHYS 143. 

 

Special Topics (2)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 397 A: Honors 100 Peer Educator Seminar (SSc)

HONORS 397 A: Honors 100 Peer Educator Seminar (SSc)

SLN 15326 (View UW registration info »)

Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu
Nadra Fredj
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 2
Limit: 25 students

Credit Type

For 2021 Peer Educators Only.

Honors 100 Peer Educator Spring prep seminar.

HONORS 398 A: The Brain and the Healing Power of Poetry (A&H)

HONORS 398 A: The Brain and the Healing Power of Poetry (A&H)

SLN 15327 (View UW registration info »)

Arthur Ginsberg (Classics)
Office: Classics, Box 353110
Phone: 2063694836
Email: arthurginsberg@msn.com

Credits: 2, c/nc
Limit: 16 students

Credit Type

Note: this is a 2 credit course so will only count towards UW general education requirements, not Honors core curriculum.
Brain and the Healing Power of Poetry introduces students to the role of poetry in dealing with illness and grief, and where poetry originates in the human brain. Students will work in a workshop setting and write their own poems culminating in a book that will be published by the end of the semester. Great poets of the 19th and 20th centuries will be reviewed as well as basic brain anatomy, physiology and functional imaging techniques.