University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Autumn 2024

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

Honors Arts & Humanities (4)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 210 A: Black Sound Studies and the Archive (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 210 A: Black Sound Studies and the Archive (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 16440 (View UW registration info »)

Sonnet Retman (American Ethnic Studies)
Phone: 206 543-0470
Email: sretman@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

This course explores Black sound studies and the archive. If official archives and histories have silenced and suppressed Black lives in the transatlantic diaspora, how might we listen for and locate unofficial archives of Black sound where Black people are the makers and shapers of the story? What complex histories, experiences, memories and feelings might such an archive make audible? What might be left unsaid, quiet? What listening practices, what “ethics of care,” might such an archive require? To pursue these questions, we will focus on various facets of Black sound studies, including scholarship on the voice, soundscapes, audio technology, music making, performance repertoires and modes of listening. We will engage with a range of musical genres, including blues, jazz, spirituals, R & B, soul, rock, hip hop, dub and Afro-Cuban music, and read recent works in critical sound studies alongside essays, reviews, poetry, fiction, liner notes and other sonic texts. We will attend to the ways that sound travels and makes place, sounding historical events and social movements. We will account for the ways in which performers, artists, writers, listeners, and critics have pushed against the commodification of Black sound to imagine new politics and listening practices and alternative ways of being and belonging.

HONORS 210 B: Babylon Berlin: Gender, Identity and Sexuality Between the Wars (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 210 B: Babylon Berlin: Gender, Identity and Sexuality Between the Wars (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 16441 (View UW registration info »)

Kye Terrasi (German Studies)
Email: kterrasi@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

Berlin between the two world wars was a locus of chaos and dramatic social upheaval; it was also the site of some of the most dynamic shifts in gender roles and identity, sexual freedoms and gay and lesbian rights. In this course we will examine the New Woman and her relationship to the rise of mass media and consumer culture, the contradictions of the promised sexual liberation in the new metropolis, the emergence of new gender roles in the theater and cabarets, Berlin as the center of gay culture, and the dramatic shifts in the perception of masculinity after the war. With an interdisciplinary focus on the intersection of gender, sexual orientation, race and class, we will explore the way in which gender was constructed at the time, the development of the first gay emancipation movement and the move to a more open, flexible definition of gender identity. Students will not only receive a thorough overview of the most important figures, works and ideas of the time period, but will also reflect on responses to the shifting gender constructions, the threat to LGBTQ rights, ways of resisting persistent patriarchal structures, and the fragility and vulnerability of our hard-won freedoms. Given the urgency and universality of these topics, students can see the relevance of the course content to their own lives, and our discussions on Weimar Berlin will serve as a framework to critically examine current social justice issues. Innovative methods of evaluation will emphasize a creative processing of the material, allowing students to adapt their analyses of the coursework to correspond to their interests and to utilize their unique skill sets.

HONORS 210 C: Artists' Books: Reading with the Mind and Body (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 210 C: Artists' Books: Reading with the Mind and Body (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 16442 (View UW registration info »)

Ileana Marin (Comparative History of Ideas; Comparative Literature)
Phone: 206 604-1831
Email: marini@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

Unlike printed books filled with text, artists’ books are made of unconventional materials: cloth, old maps, pressed soda cans, glass, folded carboard, wood cubes, wax, and many more surprising materials. Their designs, even more than their minimalistic texts, tell stories, create meanings, and impact the lives of those who handle them. Reading with both our minds and bodies while handling some of them, students will unfold or unpack them, bend or move around them in order to follow the journeys their creators have conceived for us. During our visits to the UW Special Collections, students will handle the most extraordinary objects: Julie Chen’s Accretion of Identity, a box containing 4 levels of paper folded boxes that share her coming-of-age as a Chinese American; Maureen Cummins’ Crazy Quilt, which challenges us to unfold the quilt-shaped “book” and feel the suffering of Black enslaved women; and, among other artefacts, Beth Thielen’s The Tower, a small replica of a prison tower, inside which there are powerful testimonials written by San Quentin Prison inmates. Students will thus approach their powerful political, social, ecological, and personal statements through direct experience, guided by fundamental texts on artists books written by Stefan Kilma, Elaine Speight & Charles Quick, and Johanna Drucker. The class will also have the opportunity to design their own artists’ books in two workshops run by the local artist Becky Johnston, who will teach us how to make a flag book and a triangle book, for which we will write a short text.

HONORS 210 D: Aristotle's Concept of The Tragic in Theory and Practice (A&H, W)

HONORS 210 D: Aristotle's Concept of The Tragic in Theory and Practice (A&H, W)

SLN 16443 (View UW registration info »)

James Clauss (Classics)
Email: jjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 5 students

Honors Credit Type

For millennia, Aristotle’s definition of Tragedy as preserved in his treatise Poetics influenced theoreticians and literary artists. In this course, we will reexamine this definition as part of his broader theory of mimetic art and his scientific approach to literature. Thereafter we will read plays, Classical and post-Classical, applying this definition as a way of critiquing it and perhaps coming to our own understanding of what “The Tragic” is not only on the stage but in life. The final project will involve the creation of a real or hypothetical dramatic project in which students incorporate their own reactions to Aristotle’s definition; that is, students will describe the “tragedy” that they would write in the wake of our readings and discussions. It is not necessary to write a play, but rather a description of the one that they might imagine producing.

 

Honors Science (4)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NSc, W)

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NSc, W)

SLN 16444 (View UW registration info »)

Oliver Fraser (Astronomy)
Office: PAB C324, Box 351580
Email: ojf@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

8 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

Storytelling is ancient, effective, and satisfying, but using stories to communicate the nuances and ambiguities of science can be a challenge. In this course students will craft presentations that reflect their personal interests in nature and science, and in doing so they will learn how to effectively explain their own work, helping them develop into experts in their field. The class is centered around two presentations of a scientific nature, as well as a storytelling assignment intended to develop your verbal acuity. You will work closely in small groups to develop your presentation, delivered on days set aside for this purpose.

HONORS 220 B: Biology for Leaders (NSc, W)

HONORS 220 B: Biology for Leaders (NSc, W)

SLN 16445 (View UW registration info »)

Audrey Ragsac (Biology)
Email: auragsac@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

10 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

As a future leader, what do you need to know about biology to make informed decisions affecting you and your community? How can you convince legislators and community members that your decisions are based on current science? In this interdisciplinary course, you will learn about paradigm shifting moments in biology, the ideas and actions that caused them, the controversies surrounding them, and the cultural and socioeconomic contexts that molded them. Possible topics include: Evolution, Germ Theory, Vaccines, Antibiotic Resistance, The Central Dogma, Genetic Engineering, Climate Change, The Sixth Extinction, and the Opioid Epidemic.

By learning the science behind these moments, you will better understand biological processes and develop the ability to identify biological patterns. You will also explore these moments in their cultural and socioeconomic contexts, forming connections between science and broader societal issues. As you are a future leader who will work with a wide range of people, scientific jargon will be translated into plain language as often as possible. Eventually, you will practice communicating biology in plain language, so that you can apply these newfound skills to leading your community into an uncertain future while making informed decisions.

Initial exploring of paradigm shifting moments in biology will center on popular science and/or textbook readings. These readings will support in-class, group discussion activities designed to strengthen connections. Assigments that could be incorporated into the Honors portfolio include: short oral presentations (slides and video recordings), class debates (written summary) , press releases, and essays.

HONORS 220 C: Evolution and Human Behavior (NSc, W)

HONORS 220 C: Evolution and Human Behavior (NSc, W)

SLN 16446 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

10 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these: Why are women and men different? Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy? Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children? When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why? What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

HONORS 220 E: Calderwood Seminar: Math That Lies (NSc, W)

HONORS 220 E: Calderwood Seminar: Math That Lies (NSc, W)

SLN 16447 (View UW registration info »)

Neal Koblitz (Mathematics)
Office: C-335 Padelford, Box 354350
Phone: 543-4386
Email: koblitz@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 7 students

Honors Credit Type

This will be a 5-credit seminar on public writing. Students will learn how to interrogate quantitative arguments and dubious uses of numerical data – in controversies regarding public health (COVID-19), race (redlining), education (value-added modeling), investment strategies (buying land), and other aspects of society. Each student will write five short pieces (such as a book review or op-ed), which will be edited by other students and further workshopped during class. Readings will consist of three books and several shorter pieces, including “Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil and a chapter of “How to Lie with Statistics” by Darrell Huff.

The goal will be to learn to write clearly and persuasively for a general readership about quantitative aspects of socially important controversies. The course is open to mathematical science majors as well as to students in any major in the Honors Program.

Because this course is jointly listed with MATH 380A, students enrolled in HONORS 220E will be expected to complete an additional project in this course in order for it to be applied toward their Honors requirements. Please plan to discuss project details with Professor Koblitz at the beginning of the quarter.

Honors Social Sciences (3)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (SSc, W)

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (SSc, W)

SLN 16448 (View UW registration info »)

Roger Soder (Education)
Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
Email: rsoder@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

15 seats reserved for incoming Honors students.

We will consider the following five propositions for the conduct of good (i.e., ethical and effective) leadership:

1. Leadership involves at its base the creation of a persuaded audience; but beyond that, leadership involves creating and sustaining a more thoughtful public, a public capable of rising above itself.

2. A more thoughtful public must not only be created and sustained, but, given that things inevitably fall apart, must be recovered and reconstituted.

3. Leadership always has a political context; leadership in a democracy is necessarily different than leadership in other kinds of political regimes.

4. Leadership always involves assumptions (tacit and acknowledged) about human nature.

5. In a free political regime, assuming free and fair elections, we get the kinds of leaders we deserve and we must consider how to behave in ways to deserve the kinds of leaders we say we want.

 

Sources of texts will include Tocqueville, Orwell, Machiavelli, Bacon, Dostoevsky, and Sophocles, as well as contemporary authors. Method of instruction: close reading of texts, coupled with fifteen 1-2 page single-spaced papers on texts, plus a longer (approximately 6,500 words) synthesis paper; small and large group discussions with each other, two lectures, and a visiting scholars/practitioner. 

Professor Soder is glad to talk with you further about any aspect of the course, please reach him via email: rsoder@uw.edu

HONORS 230 B: Music on the Move: Sound, Mobility and Meaning (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 230 B: Music on the Move: Sound, Mobility and Meaning (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16449 (View UW registration info »)

James Morford (Music)
Email: morforjb@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

How do individuals and populations respond when they become displaced from the source of musical practices that have shaped their identity? What happens to music as it becomes entangled with the people, practices, and meanings of a new place? How do the expectations of tourists shape the personas of musical performers? This course seeks to address these and other questions through an interdisciplinary look at music on the move, with content sourced from fields including music studies, geography, anthropology, sociology, and business/marketing. Students will explore the ways that music and meaning are associated with conceptions of place, focusing on aspects of transformation and change as musics, musicians, and audiences travel. This course balances broad comparative issues with considerations of specific peoples and practices located within and traveling between Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Themes emphasized in the course include the emergence of tradition and nostalgia, cultural appropriation, identity formation in diasporas, technology and its roles, and the tensions at play between stakeholders who function as producers, consumers, or both.

HONORS 230 C: Education and Power (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 230 C: Education and Power (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16450 (View UW registration info »)

Nadra Fredj
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

“Education and Power” will examine the connections between education, power, and liberation through an examination of U.S. systems of education, the criminal legal system, abolitionist frameworks, and critical pedagogy. Students will engage in these concepts alongside incarcerated students at the Washington Correction’s Center for Women, in a mixed-enrollment classroom. Central texts for the course will include Bell Hooks’ “Teaching Transgress: Education as the practice of freedom” and Paolo Freire’s “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”.

Topics will include:
– Foundational texts & theoretical frameworks for critical pedagogy and abolition
– History of education systems in the U.S. as they relate to privilege, power, and exclusion
– Mass incarceration (historical context & current reality)
– School-to-prison pipeline & other connections between education & carceral system
– Role of education in liberation and resistance movements
– Education demographics & landscape within U.S. prisons & jails
– Universities as a space for both exclusion & liberation

Honors Interdisciplinary (4)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Honors Electives requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Inquiry designation.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Narratives of Self and Society (C, W)

HONORS 345 A: Narratives of Self and Society (C, W)

SLN 16452 (View UW registration info »)

Nicole Peters (English)
Email: petersnc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

This class will look at storytelling and ways of knowing through personal essays and memoirs, tracing how nonfiction genres offer unique spaces to consider epistemologies of the self while simultaneously speaking to shared human experiences. We will discuss how various narratives use the self as a starting point to integrate/extrapolate into the social as a way to process, understand, and engage with the world.
Amidst reading a diverse range of personal narratives (written, visual, spoken), students will write weekly reflections that unpack their experiences of consuming and engaging these texts, while also developing their abilities to tell their own stories across a range of genres and mediums.

HONORS 391 A: The Art of Understanding Science (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

HONORS 391 A: The Art of Understanding Science (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

SLN 16453 (View UW registration info »)

KC Cole (Physics)
Email: kc314@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Playwrights, poets, philosophers, filmmakers, sculptors and novelists all use the cosmos as their inspiration and subject matter; scientists themselves have worked in all of these genres in their efforts to communicate with the general public, and also with each other. The class will explore each of these forms, working in groups to showcase and share the multiple ways that physics, math, chemistry and life sciences have found their way into the arts (or, frequently, vice versa). Students will write reflections based on readings and viewings for each class; they will produce both a group project and a final project to be presented to their classmates: These can take the from of fiction, theater, film, extended essay, research paper (with an arts component), visual arts project. The scientific content must be accurate and deepen our understanding of the subject matter, providing original insights.

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16454 (View UW registration info »)

Catherine Connors (Classics)
Office: Denny 262 B, Box 353110
Phone: 206- 543-2266
Email: cconnors@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

15 seats reserved for incoming freshmen
In this course we shall read and discuss ancient Greek and Roman sources on religion, philosophy, medicine and law along with modern scholarly analyses of ancient society to explore the roles of women of various statuses and ethnicities in ancient Greek and Roman societies. Our goals are: to acquire a strong familiarity through analysis of primary sources with the features of social and civic life in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to gain a critical awareness of scholarly analysis of the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to reflect on the beliefs, policies and actions that shaped and constrained the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world and how these issues can be understood in relation to issues of gender, class and status in modern contexts.

HONORS 394 B: The Idea of the University (A&H / SSc, W)

HONORS 394 B: The Idea of the University (A&H / SSc, W)

SLN 23641 (View UW registration info »)

Tony Lucero (International Studies, Comparative History of Ideas)
Phone: 206 616-1643
Email: jal26@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

10 seats reserved for incoming Honors students.

Is the University an agent of colonialism, capitalism, and the state? Alternatively, is it a crucible for social change and resistance? Is it all of these things? Can it be something else? This course examines the university as simultaneously a crime scene, a site for healing, and a place for transformation.

Find more information here.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16432 (View UW registration info »)

Lilian Tang (Honors Program; Advisor)
Email: liliant@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 140 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have 5-6 larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter. During the rest of the quarter, you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Facilitator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 Peer Facilitator, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities and resources available at UW and in the Honors Program. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will have opportunities to: hear from other Honors students, staff, and faculty; create your Honors Portfolio which process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom; learn how to engage in experiential learning activities during your time at the UW; and begin your understanding of what an interdisciplinary education looks like for you.

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16432 (View UW registration info »)

Lilian Tang (Honors Program; Advisor)
Email: liliant@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 126 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have 5-6 larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter. During the rest of the quarter, you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Facilitator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 Peer Facilitator, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities and resources available at UW and in the Honors Program. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will have opportunities to: hear from other Honors students, staff, and faculty; create your Honors Portfolio which process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom; learn how to engage in experiential learning activities during your time at the UW; and begin your understanding of what an interdisciplinary education looks like for you.

Honors Electives (11)

Any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Honors Electives requirement. You will earn Areas of Inquiry credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

SLN 11456 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4

Honors Credit Type

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 BIOL/CHEM GPA.

CONTACT ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU
TO ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12496 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either MATH 124 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; score of 66% on HCHEMC placement test, score of 3, 4 or 5 on AP Chemistry exam, or IB score of 5, 6, or 7 on high level chemistry exam.

Students must also register for CHEM 145 AA, AB, AC, or AD.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

$85 course fee

CHEM 145 and CHEM 155 cover material in CHEM 142, CHEM 152, and CHEM 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 142, CHEM145 (5 credits); CHEM 145, CHEM 155, CHEM 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 257 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 257 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12628 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 221, CHEM 223, CHEM 237, CHEM 335.

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

SLN 13463 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 122 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 122 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 HA section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 122 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

Computer programming for students with some previous programming experience. Emphasizes program design, style, and decomposition. Uses data structures (e.g., lists, dictionaries, sets) to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Introduces data abstraction and interface versus implementation. Recommended: CSE 121 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

SLN 13464 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 123 lecture
2. corresponding CSE 123 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. CSE 390 HB

Computer programming for students with significant previous programming experience. Emphasizes implementation and run-time analysis of data structures and algorithms using techniques including linked references, recursion, and object-oriented inheritance to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Recommended: CSE 122 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

ENGL 182 K: Composition: Multimodal (C)

ENGL 182 K: Composition: Multimodal (C)

SLN 14877 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

This course will count toward your Honors Elective requirement AND the UW English Composition requirement. Student must be registered for Honors specific section.

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Priority I & II Registration for incoming honors students. Fill out Honors Add Code and Course Override form to request add code.

English 182 focuses on teaching strategies and skills for effective writing and argument that are required of traditional academic genres, such as the research essay, while also expanding the skills for composing in multimodal genres that our increasingly digital and media saturated world demands.

Section K is an Honors discussion driven class with minimal lecturing and grounded in a disability studies analytic.  Students will reflect on their own growth as scholars and their learning process as an evolving product. Honors students will write longer reflective papers with emphasis on metacognitive critical takeaways.

English 182K (Honors) syllabus

ENGL 282 A: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

ENGL 282 A: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

SLN 14935 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

This course will count toward your Honors Elective requirement AND the UW English Composition requirement.

Add code required. Email uwhonors@uw.edu to request code

Intermediate Multimodal Composition:Strategies for composing effective multimodal texts for print, digital physical delivery, with focus on affordances of various modes–words, images, sound, design, and gesture–and genres to address specific rhetorical situations both within and beyond the academy. Although the course has no prerequisites, instructors assume knowledge of academic writing.

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (SSc)

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (SSc)

SLN 17304 (View UW registration info »)

Theodore Myhre (School of Law)
Phone: 206-685-7914
Email: tmyhre@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen.

Add code required to register. Email uwhonors@uw.edu for add code.

Students must register for the Honors section of this course in order to receive Honors Elective credit.

Examines the structure of the American legal system and how laws are made. Surveys key doctrinal areas of the law learning fundamental legal concepts, and explore how the law functions and evolves over time, including legal issues and decision-making related to statutory or common law.

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

SLN 18432 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

REGISTRATION INFORMATION AVAILABLE:
HTTPS://TINYURL.COM/UWMATH134

Covers the material of MATH 124, MATH 125, MATH 126; MATH 307, MATH 308. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for MATH 124 after taking MATH 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

SLN 18475 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 136, or minimum grade of 3.0 in all MATH 126 and MATH 307 and MATH 308.

Please contact advising@math.washington.edu if you have questions about this course.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 141 A: Honors Physics Mechanics (NSc)

PHYS 141 A: Honors Physics Mechanics (NSc)

SLN 20705 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either a minimum grade of 2.5 in MATH 124, MATH 134, which may be taken concurrently, a minimum score of 4 on the AP Calculus AB exam, or a minimum score of 3 on the AP Calculus BC exam; recommended: high school-level physics course.

For information on introductory Honors physics sequence, visit https://phys.washington.edu/141-142-143-courses

To register concurrently with MATH 134, email phys1xx@uw.edu

$50 course fee

Addresses same material as PHYS 121 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 114, PHYS 117, PHYS 121, and PHYS 141. 

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