University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Autumn 2019

Differences between 2010-14 and 2015 Honors core requirements

Each course below lists the Interdisciplinary Honors category it will fulfill if you are on the “2010-14” or “2015” core curriculum. If you have any questions about what category a course will fulfill, please check your degree audit on MyPlan and/or contact us at uwhonors@uw.edu.

Except where noted, current Interdisciplinary Honors students may self-register using the SLN/MyPlan. Please let us know if you have any difficulties at uwhonors@uw.edu.

H-Arts & Humanities (6)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 210 A: American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music

HONORS 210 A: American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music (VLPA, DIV)

SLN 15990 (View UW registration info »)

Marisol Berrios-Miranda (Music)
Email: marisolbmd1@yahoo.com

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

6 Seats Reserved for Incoming Freshmen
Latino contributions to popular music in the United States have too often been relegated to the margins of a narrative dominated by African and European Americans-an overly black and white view of our musical history. Latin music is often portrayed as an exotic resource for “American” musicians, as suggested by pianist Jelly Roll Morton’s reference to “the Latin Tinge.” This course turns that phrase and that perspective on its head. “American Sabor” addresses problems of cultural representation that concern an increasingly visible and influential community in the U.S. We will document the roles of U.S. Latino musicians as interpreters of Latin American genres. We will also highlight their roles as innovators within genres normally considered indigenous to the U.S., such as rock and roll, R & B, jazz, country/western, and hip hop. The course distinguishes regional centers of Latino population and music production-exploring unique histories, artists, and musical styles. At the same time it draws out broader patterns of boundary crossing, language, social struggle, generational difference, racial/ethnic/class/gender identification, and other factors that shape the experiences of U.S. Latinos everywhere.

HONORS 210 B: Distant Connections: Black Political Consciousness in Germany and the United States

HONORS 210 B: Distant Connections: Black Political Consciousness in Germany and the United States (VLPA, DIV)

SLN 15991 (View UW registration info »)

Anne Potjans (English)
Email: Anne.Potjans@cms.hu-berlin.de

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
In the aftermath of World War II, encounters between African Americans and Germans had important political and cultural effects on both sides of the Atlantic. However, while most scholarly attention has been devoted to the impact of this encounter on the African American community, only few such debates have considered the impact of these encounters on German society and the emergence of a Black German political consciousness. In this seminar we will look at the cultural conjunctions between these two diasporic communities as they are mediated through cultural productions, such as fictional and non-fictional literary texts, music and film, as well as through activism and community politics. Students in this class will thus become acquainted with theoretical and methodological approaches from Black Studies, Black Diaspora Studies, and Critical Mixed Race studies, as well as critical perspectives on transnationalism.
I understand the political and cultural debates that ensued around relationships between African American soldiers and white German women during the immediate post-war years in both countries as a case in point to shed light on the convergence of German and US American anti-Black sentiments and political agendas. Moving on from there, the focus of this seminar will be on the 1980s, the formative years of Black German political activism and community formation, and the community’s development up until the present.
In the early stages of the Black German movement, interactions between Black German women and the Black American writer, activist, and scholar Audre Lorde were an important driving force. Highlighting the fact that Black queer women continue to be at the forefront of community formation in both cultural contexts, another theoretical focus of this seminar is on intersectionality, as well as Black feminist and Black queer modes of knowledge production.

HONORS 210 C: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome

HONORS 210 C: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome (VLPA)

SLN 15992 (View UW registration info »)

Michael Ritter (Classics)
Email: mritte@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
The transition from the Republic to the Imperial period in Roman history brought stability and a reprieve from generations of civil wars, but it also signaled a loss of rights. The central question of this course will be what the Romans ultimately gave up for this authoritarian stability and why. Through primary and secondary sources as well as archaeological evidence, we will use this period as a lens to investigate the curtailing of rights such as freedom of speech and democracy. We will further consider what role the civil wars and class conflict played in the breakdown of the republican system.

HONORS 240 A: Basic Drawing

HONORS 240 A: Basic Drawing (VLPA)

SLN 16001 (View UW registration info »)

Ann Gale (Art)
Email: galenic@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 22 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

6 seats reserved for incoming freshmen.
Course description coming soon!

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

ARCH 350 B: Architecture of the Ancient World

ARCH 350 B: Architecture of the Ancient World (VLPA)

SLN 10381 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Additional Any

$50 course fee.

Students must register for both lecture and section.

Email uwhonors@uw.edu for add code.

Students must register for the Honors section of this course in order to receive Honors Additional Any credit

This course is an upper division class examining the history of ancient architecture, beginning with the earliest known structures in the prehistoric period around 10,000 BCE and ending around the 11th century CE. The requirements are regular attendance of weekly lectures, written assignments and a mid term and final exam. The Honors discussion section meets once a week with the class instructor to facilitate a more critical engagement with the historical survey material presented in the thrice-weekly lectures. Emphasis shall be placed on the exploration of contemporary concerns within the context of the survey’s major themes that include architecture as a second nature; origins and mythologies of first cities; power, politics and space; concepts of the sacred; and gender and space.

Course Objectives:
· Understand the built environment of the past and present as an expression of the social, technological and aesthetic forces of the societies that built them and as settings for their everyday life, rites and rituals.

·Demonstrate an understanding of architectural vocabulary by being able to define building types and key terms that relate to design, construction and materials.

·Understand drawing conventions in architectural drawing (for eg: plan, section, elevation, perspectives and details) as a means to describe three-dimensional objects and sites.

·Demonstrate the capacity to critically analyze the key works and communicate ideas effectively about the built environment in a series of writing assignments and tests, and in class discussions.

·Foster an appreciation for built works not just as self-contained physical artifacts of a distant past but as social, living texts that express the complexities and contradictions of the cultures of the past and of the present

ENGL 182 K: Multimodal: Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres

ENGL 182 K: Multimodal: Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres (C)

SLN 14440 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Additional Any

Incoming Freshmen Only

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Explicit focus on how multimodal elements of writing–words, images, sound, design, etc.– work together to produce meaning.

Additional course information coming soon!

H-Science (10)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NW)

SLN 15993 (View UW registration info »)

Oliver Fraser (Astronomy)
Email: ojf@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
Storytelling is ancient, effective, and satisfying, but using stories to communicate the nuances and ambiguities of science can be a challenge. In this course students will craft presentations that reflect their personal interests in nature and science, and in doing so they will learn how to effectively explain their own work, helping them develop into experts in their field.

The class is centered around two presentations of a scientific nature, as well as a mythic storytelling assignment intended to develop storytelling skills. You will work closely in small groups to develop your presentation, delivered on days set aside for this purpose.

HONORS 220 B: Game Theory and its Applications

HONORS 220 B: Game Theory and its Applications (NW)

SLN 15994 (View UW registration info »)

Jacob Cooper (Biology)
Office: LSB 5th floor, Box 351800
Email: yankel@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
In game theory, a “game” is any interaction in which decisions must be made. Penalty kicks in soccer. Nuclear disarmament. Predator-prey behaviors. Hostage negotiation. Voting coalitions. Auction bidding. Insurance pricing. Cooperative hunting. Fish schooling. Political collusion. Information sharing. And on and on and on.

Game theory is a math toolkit used to analyze games. It’s a way to formalize games, to think about their strategies, their dynamics, and the expected actions of others. Game theory is the study of how we do — and do not — get along.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NW)

SLN 11404 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 BIOL/CHEM GPA.

MAY CONTACT
ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU TO
ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12318 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 96 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Prerequisite: either MATH 124 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; score of 66% on HCHEMC placement test, score of 3, 4 or 5 on AP Chemistry exam, or IB score of 5, 6, or 7 on high level chemistry exam.

Students must also register for CHEM 145 AA, AB, AC, or AD.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

CHEM 145 and CHEM 155 cover material in CHEM 142, CHEM 152, and CHEM 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 142, CHEM145 (5 credits); CHEM 145, CHEM 155, CHEM 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12440 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 70 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 221, CHEM 223, CHEM 237, CHEM 335.

CSE 142: Computer Programming I

CSE 142: Computer Programming I (NW)

SLN ?

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

VISIT CSE ADVISING TO REGISTER.

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 H section

See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

CSE 143: Computer Programming II

CSE 143: Computer Programming II (NW)

SLN ?

Credits: 5+1

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

VISIT CSE ADVISING TO REGISTER.

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 143 A or CSE 143 D or 142 X
2. corresponding CSE 143 section (AA – AV or DA – DF or XA – XH)
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. corresponding CSE 390 H section

See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)

SLN 18113 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

To register, speak with Math Department adviser via C-36 Padelford or email advising@math.washington.edu.
Covers the material of MATH 124, MATH 125, MATH 126; MATH 307, MATH 308. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for MATH 124 after taking MATH 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NW)

SLN 18192 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Prerequisite: either minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 136, or minimum grade of 3.0 in all MATH 126 and MATH 307 and MATH 308.

Please contact advising@math.washington.edu if interested in this course.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 121 B: Honors Physics: Mechanics

PHYS 121 B: Honors Physics: Mechanics (NW)

SLN 20204 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 66 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Prerequisite: MATH 124, 127, 134, or 145, may be taken concurrently; recommended: one year HS physics.

Students must also sign up for an Honors tutorial section and a lab.

Contact Physics adviser (physrecp@uw.edu) for add code.

Email Professor Rybka, the instructor for the course, for more information about the course. His email address is: grybka@uw.edu

$40 course fee

Basic principles of mechanics and experiments in mechanics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 114 and PHYS 121.

H-Social Sciences (6)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (I&S)

SLN 15996 (View UW registration info »)

Roger Soder (Education)
Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
Email: rsoder@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

15 seats reserved for current students
15 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen (unused seats will be released to all students in mid-August)

We will consider the following six interrelated propositions, and we will consider the implications of these propositions for the conduct of good (i.e., ethical and effective) leadership.

1. Leadership involves at its base the creation of a persuaded audience; but beyond that, leadership involves creating and sustaining a more thoughtful public, a public capable of rising above itself.

2. A more thoughtful public must not only be created and sustained, but, given that things inevitably fall apart, must be recovered and reconstituted.

3. Good leadership involves ethical and effective information seeking. A leader must have knowledge of what must be done, knowledge of what it takes to persuade others of what must be done (and, in persuading, helping to create a more thoughtful public), and knowledge of how an audience/public will respond. Only with a thorough understanding of the principles, strategies, and costs of information seeking will one be able to engage in ethical and effective leadership.

4. Leadership always has a political context; leadership in a democracy is necessarily different than leadership in other kinds of political regimes.

5. Leadership always involves assumptions (tacit and acknowledged) about human nature.

6. In a free political regime, assuming free and fair elections, we get the kinds of leaders we deserve and we must consider how to behave in ways to deserve the kinds of leaders we say we want.

Sources of texts will include Tocqueville, Orwell, Machiavelli, Bacon, Dostoevsky, and Sophocles, as well as contemporary authors.

Method of instruction: close reading of texts, coupled with fifteen 1-2 page single-spaced papers on texts, plus a longer (approximately 6,500 words) synthesis paper; small and large group discussions with each other, two lectures, and two visiting scholars/practitioners.

Throughout the quarter, we will make theoretical and practical applications of key concepts to consideration of the critical issues of climate change and climate change communication.

For further details, please see 230 class page at the class web page (canvas.uw.edu). Once at the 230 class page, go to \”files\” and you’ll see links to most of the readings plus the Autumn 2018 syllabus. (Note: 2019 syllabus will be roughly the same.) I strongly recommend consulting the syllabus with care in order to get a sense of expectations and consequent demands on your time.

You will note that some of the readings are deceptively short in length. For example, our readings from Tocqueville’s Democracy in America are all of thirteen pages. The Bacon essay, just three pages. But these texts (and others throughout the course) demand multiple close readings.

I will be glad to talk with you further about any aspect of the course. The surest way to reach me is via email: rsoder@uw.edu

HONORS 230 B: LGBTI Rights in International Affairs

HONORS 230 B: LGBTI Rights in International Affairs (I&S, DIV)

SLN 15997 (View UW registration info »)

Elise Carlson-Rainer (Scandinavian Studies)
Email: eacr@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
LGBTI rights in foreign policy represent the evolution of a principle in human rights that formerly did not impact international affairs. Promoting LGBTI rights in foreign policy introduces a new set of principles and moral standards that regulate international relations according to emerging human rights norms. International relations are now reevaluated due to new standards, such as the U.S. and Sweden’s bilateral relationships with Uganda. During this course, students will examine the intense global debate over LGBTI equality norms within a global and domestic context; how human rights concepts evolve, strategies of social movements, as well as how states influence one another.

The goal of this course is for students to understand why and how LGBTI rights were introduced into some nations’ foreign policies. What were the catalysts to institutionalize sexual minority rights into the respective foreign policies? The course will examine differences in social mobilizations and in particular the role of NGOs, insider governmental allies, national interest, transnational activists, and sensitizing events for same sex relations globally, as central factors for developing respective foreign policy agendas. Students will investigate the varying strategies civil society groups and leaders have, and continue, to employ in order to influence institutional change across cultures and global regions. Students will focus first on human rights norm entrepreneur nations. Specifically, social movements in Scandinavia that have led to reforms internationally on LGBTI equality. Next, students will analyze human rights in countries such as the United States, where human rights in foreign policy at times presents a paradox when compared to its domestic human rights record. Students will engage with leading American and international activists. Through guest speakers, group projects, and simulations students will gain experiential learning of human rights advocacy.

HONORS 230 C: How to Write the History of the Aztecs

HONORS 230 C: How to Write the History of the Aztecs (I&S, DIV)

SLN 15998 (View UW registration info »)

Adam Warren (History)
Office: Smith 218C, Box 353560
Email: awarren2@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 10 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

This course examines the challenges historians face when writing the history of the Aztecs (Mexica), a people whose codices, or written pictorial records of their past, were largely destroyed by the Spanish after colonization in 1521. In asking how historians investigate and interpret the histories of populations when traditional forms of primary source evidence are unavailable, we will complicate our thinking about how historical knowledge is produced. In the process, we will also examine the broader history of the Aztec Empire and the Spanish colonial society that formed in its aftermath. Particular attention will be paid to notions of religion, cosmology, and daily life among the Aztecs.

HONORS 230 E: Making the Human: Empire, Race, and Species

HONORS 230 E: Making the Human: Empire, Race, and Species (I&S, DIV)

SLN 16000 (View UW registration info »)

Maria Elena Garcia (Comparative History of Ideas; Jackson School of International Studies; Anthropology)
Office: B102 Padelford Hall, Box 354300
Phone: 206 221-0561
Email: meg71@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

Meets one day week plus excursions and independent work outside of class

5 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

“You know why you can enjoy a day at the zoo?” Donald Trump Jr. asked in a 2019 Instagram post. “Because walls work.” Such a statement provoked immediate criticism, but it is an artifact of the long and entangled histories of humanity and animality as they converge in the constructions of race, empire, and nation. This seminar invites students to think critically about what it means to be human. We will engage ideologies of race, empire and species, and consider how animality has been central to the project of western civilization. Students will explore histories of zoos and food production, the politics of immigration and decolonial movements, and the significance of Indigenous epistemologies. By the end of the course, students will be able to critically discuss the work of classic and contemporary social theorists, describe the ways in which varied vectors of difference (e.g. race, dis/ability, gender, species) have been objects of civilizing projects, and explain the ontological and epistemological contributions of Indigenous scholars to critiques of western civilization. Through seminar discussions, field trips, collaborative projects, and in-class exercises, we will think together about what foregrounding a more-than-human understanding of “life” might make possible in the construction of alternative political and social orders.

HONORS 230 F: Parks in Progress or Peril? An exploration of the mission, values, and future of the US National Park System

HONORS 230 F: Parks in Progress or Peril? An exploration of the mission, values, and future of the US National Park System (I&S)

SLN 22942 (View UW registration info »)

Aley Mills Willis (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
Phone: 221-6074
Email: aleym@uw.edu
Laura Harrington (Honors Program; Graduate Student Assistant)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 205 543-7444
Email: laurah13@uw.edu
Brook Kelly (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206.221.6131
Email: bbkelly@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 9 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

Students enrolled in this course must complete both the Field Study trip in September and the follow up course in Autumn Quarter

Field Study dates: September 3rd – 15th.

$600 fee to cover travel, lodging and food expenses for field study component. Fee due July 1, 2019

NOTE: as of May 2, this course has reached capacity. You may complete the form below to request placement on our waitlist, which will be maintained through the summer.

Complete this form for add code: https://forms.gle/9XSihikCkmFjsEKW9 Add codes will be distributed beginning May 10, 2019.

Students will participate in a two week trip from Mount Rainier National Park to Olympic National Park to North Cascades National Park. No camping or backpacking experience is required, but an open mind and a sense of adventure are! Students should be comfortable hiking moderately strenuous trails almost every day of the trip, camping in remote locations, and traveling and lodging in primitive and close quarters.

America’s National Park system, the first of its kind in the world, has been called, “the best idea America ever had”, a sentiment echoed repeatedly since it was first uttered by James Bryce in 1912. This course will examine the history of this unique idea, as well as the mission and values behind it. What do national parks mean to people? To the flora and fauna within? And what does it mean for a country to set aside the space for nearly 400 natural, cultural, and recreational sites and attempt to leave them “unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations”? How is this idea progressing? How might it be in peril? The mission behind this unique system provides an excellent framework for discussing America’s history, environmental ethics, political values, and much more.

This course will take students on an exciting two week field study to the three “wilderness jewels” of Washington state’s National Parks: Mount Rainier NP, Olympic NP, and North Cascades NP in September and follow with class time in Autumn Quarter. By examining the Park Service’s goals of enjoyment (recreation), education (in both history and culture, and nature and science), and inspiration, students will answer for themselves some important questions: Why does this system exist and what is its purpose in our culture? How have current political, economic and environmental pressures challenged the mission and values of the park system? Does this system, given these challenges, effectively accomplish its own goals and are those goals still relevant in America today? If so, why? If not, how might they be adjusted to become culturally viable?

Through a combination of immersed field study to three major national parks, readings, and expert speakers, students will not only introduce themselves to these diverse and unique places in our country, but also gain a greater understanding of the purpose of such a system and look critically at the cultural and environmental issues impacting the National Parks today.

SEE COURSE FLYER HERE: https://honors.uw.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Honors-National-Park-Field-Studies.jpg

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (I&S)

SLN 16975 (View UW registration info »)

Theodore Myhre (School of Law)
Phone: 206-685-7914
Email: tmyhre@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Additional Any

All seats have been distributed. Please request to be added to the waitlist at: https://tinyurl.com/LAW100REQ

Students must register for the Honors section of this course in order to receive Honors Additional Any credit

Examines the structure of the American legal system and how laws are made. Surveys key doctrinal areas of the law learning fundamental legal concepts, and explore how the law functions and evolves over time, including legal issues and decision-making related to statutory or common law.

H-Interdisciplinary (6)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Additional Any requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Accidental Poetics: Writing with chance in found situations

HONORS 345 A: Accidental Poetics: Writing with chance in found situations (C)

SLN 16004 (View UW registration info »)

July Hazard (Comparative History of Ideas)
Email: julyhaz@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

Most writing classes and workshops emphasize deliberate strategies of composition. This class explores other methods, instead. What can accident, chance, arbitrary constraints, and stumbled-upon juxtapositions bring to your writing practice? We experiment with methods from Oulipo, Surrealism, Dada, ekphrastic poetry, game theory, science writing, and beyond.

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Writing Food and Politics

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Writing Food and Politics (C, DIV)

SLN 16005 (View UW registration info »)

Damarys Espinoza (Anthropology)
Email: damarys@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

Juniors and Seniors (by year) Only
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, recently stated that she learned her most important political lessons from working in restaurants. This class looks at food as the nexus of almost all of the major forces in U.S. politics today. We will examine food as it is connected to issues such as climate change, immigration law, criminal justice reform, workers’ rights, gentrification, education and health care. We will explore these topics through an interdisciplinary lens and place-based approach by focusing on the food industry in Seattle & King County, one of the fastest growing in the nation. This class will help students develop skills to communicate publicly about the specific role that food plays in contemporary U.S. politics and social movements. Student writing will include book and restaurant reviews, interviews of leaders in the Seattle & King County food industry and more. Classes will offer an intimidate workshop setting where students engage in collaborative editing.

HONORS 392 A: Science and Engineering for Social Justice

HONORS 392 A: Science and Engineering for Social Justice (I&S / NW, DIV)

SLN 16006 (View UW registration info »)

Dianne Hendricks (Bioengineering)
Phone: 206-685-9283
Email: dgh5@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
This course explores social justice in a science and engineering context, with specific focus on race, gender, sexuality, and disability. We emphasize what students can do to advocate for and represent diverse peoples, and to promote social justice through science and engineering practice.

Throughout the course, we explore these inter-related questions:
1) How do our cultural ideas about race, gender, disability and sexuality influence science/engineering knowledge and practice?
2) On the other hand, how does our science/engineering practice influence our cultural ideas about race, gender, disability and sexuality?
3) How can we use science and engineering to promote social justice for all people?

Students reflect on the impact of science and engineering in society through weekly readings and class discussions. In addition, students complete a final paper and a team project in which they design a science/engineering solution that promotes social justice.

No prerequisite. All majors welcome!

HONORS 392 B: Planetary Politics: Human 'Beingness' in the Anthropocene

HONORS 392 B: Planetary Politics: Human ‘Beingness’ in the Anthropocene (I&S / NW, DIV)

SLN 23307 (View UW registration info »)

Karen Litfin (Political Science)
Office: 33 Gowen, Box 353530
Phone: (206) 685-3694
Email: litfin@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

The Anthropocene presents us with the problem of all problems for the following reasons:

• It was a colossal accident, caused by the everyday life choices of nearly 8 billion people-some far more than others.
• These choices are strongly driven by an amalgamation of psychological and institutional forces with deep historical and even biological roots.
• Alongside the dawning awareness of our collective planetary impact, we see tremendous upheaval social and political upheaval.

Taken alone, each of these factors presents a conundrum; taken together, they cry out for deep inquiry into the peculiar place of the “anthros” in the scheme of things. The dawning of the Anthropocene compels us to ask ourselves not only, “What on Earth are we doing?” but even more fundamentally, “What on Earth are we?” At a minimum, the new geological era highlights our species’ paradoxical relationship to the rest of creation. While these questions can be illuminated by the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, so too can we investigate them through personal and interpersonal introspection around the question, “Who am I in relation to this?” The very magnitude of the problem and its undeniable biophysical dimensions tend to transfix our gaze outwardly, yet grappling with the “anthros” also entails looking within and somehow translating our findings into collective action.

The premise of this course is that cognition will be necessary but not sufficient to address the global challenges of the 21st century. Rather than studying such issues as climate change, the extinction crisis, world food challenges, and global justice as happening only “out there,” we will view them as also happening “in here” by continually asking ourselves, “Who am in relation to this?” This holistic approach involves integrating cognitive learning with affective and somatic awareness through reflective and contemplative exercises and community engagement.

HONORS 393 A: Rhetoric of Science

HONORS 393 A: Rhetoric of Science (VLPA / NW)

SLN 16007 (View UW registration info »)

Leah Ceccarelli (Communication)
Office: CMU 145, Box 353740
Email: cecc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 24 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

4 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
Insofar as scientists use language and visual displays to communicate with others, they use rhetoric, selecting some aspects of reality to convey, and deflecting other aspects of reality from attention. Studying how scientists use rhetoric to communicate, and how nonscientists use rhetoric to argue about science and its effects in the public sphere, students in this class will discover the means of persuasion available to shape science, its products, and the relationship between both and the publics that surround them. Those who are considering a career in science will learn how to think critically about the internal and external discourse of science, improving their use of rhetorical tools in the process. Those who do not intend to become scientists will learn how to critically analyze the claims of science and respond thoughtfully and effectively to its potential influence on them in the modern world.

Student Learning Goals:
1) Understand and critically evaluate scholarship on the rhetoric of science.
2) Identify, define and use rhetorical concepts in the analysis of communication about science.
3) Recognize and evaluate the means of persuasion that can be utilized by scientists in communicating with other scientists and/or the public.
4) Recognize and evaluate the means of persuasion that can be utilized by advocates critiquing or protesting against science and/or its consequences in the public sphere.
5) Write an original rhetorical criticism essay that contributes to the subfield known as “rhetoric of science.”

HONORS 394 A: Critical Community Organizing

HONORS 394 A: Critical Community Organizing (VLPA / I&S, DIV)

SLN 16008 (View UW registration info »)

Third Andresen (Comparative History of Ideas)
Office: PDL B102B
Email: redrum@uw.edu
Velma Veloria (Comparative History of Ideas)
Email: pending

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

$35 course fee.

The purpose of Critical Community Organizing course is to learn about the relationship between community engagement, activism and communities of color in Seattle. It is designed for students both interests in community-based organizing, as well as those considering career opportunities in a variety of community-based organization and social change fields including elected office. This course intends to provide an academic and practical action framework of community organizing to effect policy change. We will hear how community members and legislature respond to social forces and how they inform political changes. We will read, view, listen to and attend community events. Throughout the quarter, students will examine the ways that race, class, gender, sexuality, indigeneity and other forms of identities construct privilege and power. This course will build on prior courses that discuss systemic oppressions in the United States. It will have a strong emphasis on civic engagements, community building and resistances to oppressions. Students will be expected to follow legislative bills that impact communities of color.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

SLN 15958 (View UW registration info »)

Carissa Mayer (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: cdmayer@uw.edu
Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 130 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS 100/496

HONORS 100/496

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement.

HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level.

Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to:
– Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do;
– Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and
– Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

SLN 15974 (View UW registration info »)

Carissa Mayer (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: cdmayer@uw.edu
Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 130 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS 100/496

HONORS 100/496

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement.

HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level.

Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to:
– Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do;
– Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and
– Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

Special Topics (0)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.