University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Autumn 2021

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

H-Arts & Humanities (5)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 210 A: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: #Black Lives Matter in Historical Context

HONORS 210 A: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: #Black Lives Matter in Historical Context (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 16391 (View UW registration info »)

LaTasha Levy (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: levyl@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 6 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

NOTE: This course will meet Wednesdays, 10:30am-1:30pm. The day/time listing on the Time Schedule is incorrect.
This course explores the emergence of #BlackLivesMatter as a critical development in a long history of Black resistance to anti-Black racism and state violence. While the recent movement has organized campaigns against police murders, mass incarceration and other iterations of racial marginalization, #BlackLivesMatter also conjures specific intellectual and activist traditions in African American history. In this course, students will examine the origins of #BlackLivesMatter, as an ideological intervention, alongside the historical events, organizations and leaders who have given it inspiration. Course material will engage the political thought of Ida B. Wells, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur and Ella Baker—all of whom figure prominently in #BlackLivesMatter historical frames. Students will also engage an ever-growing body of intellectual interventions (both academic and public scholarship) that interrogate the social, cultural, and economic contexts of racial violence in the United States and beyond.

HONORS 210 B: Diversity in the Middle Ages

HONORS 210 B: Diversity in the Middle Ages (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 16392 (View UW registration info »)

Annegret Oehme (Department of Germanics)
Email: oehme@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

NOTE: This course will meet Tuesday & Thursday from 11:30am-12:50pm. The time listed on the Time Schedule is incorrect.

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

In pop culture, especially TV shows and movies, the Middle Ages are often whitewashed and portrayed as the ‘Dark Ages’ (with Game of Thrones being the perfect example). Yet, a closer look reveals that medieval society tackled issues of diversity not just negatively but also in positive ways. We can learn from the Middle Ages that religious and cultural diversity was and is an essential feature of societies and that it is up to the people of each epoch to embrace or reject societal plurality. This seminar will provide you with a new understanding of the “not-so-dark” Middle Ages through the topic of diversity, specifically diversity aspects concerning race and racism, religion (specifically Islam, Judaism, and Christianity), disability, and gender. The class introduces discourses from this period through primary and secondary literature. However, you won’t just learn about medieval times; rather, this class also offers them an opportunity to critically review our own understanding and perception of diversity through learning about medieval ways of engaging with heterogeneous societies. You will gain direct knowledge about the Middle Ages and use it to examine our modern understanding of diversity and our modern realities. Critically engaging with ideas about the medieval times, you are guided in and encouraged to rethinking the value as well as the challenges diversity poses while learning to embrace our own contribution to the campus community and beyond as well.
 

HONORS 210 C: Okinawa in the Japanese Literary Imagination

HONORS 210 C: Okinawa in the Japanese Literary Imagination (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 16393 (View UW registration info »)

Davinder Bhowmik (Asian Languages and Literature)
Phone: 206-543-4699
Email: dbhowmik@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

10 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

This course introduces students to modern prose fiction, poetry, drama, and film that depict Okinawa, Japan’s tropical playground on one hand, and its military colony on the other. While the focus of the class will be on representations of Okinawa in literature and the occasional film we will also pay close attention to the socio-historical context of the works in order to more fully understand them. In addition to introducing students to the variety of literature and film from and about Okinawa, the course will train students to read carefully and critically; to develop the ability to construct sound readings of literary works, and to argue these readings persuasively in English. All course material will be considered historically as well as analytically. No knowledge of Japanese is required; all works are in English translation and films are subtitled.

HONORS 240 A: Russia's Big Books

HONORS 240 A: Russia’s Big Books (VLPA, W)

SLN 16402 (View UW registration info »)

Galya Diment (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: A219 Padelford Hall, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-6848
Email: galya@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

Listed with Russian and Jewish Studies

Honors students will be expected to engage more throughly (3-4 pages) on exam essay prompts.

The Russia’s Big Books courses study one big/epic novel by the titans of Russian literature per quarter. Includes such novels as Tolstoy’s War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Goncharov’s Oblomov, Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, and Nabokov’s Ada. All readings are in English. 

Honors students will complete an extended midterm and complete additional final write-ups/papers. Reflective reports will also be an optional component for Honors students.

 

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

ENGL 182 K: Honors Multimodal Composition

ENGL 182 K: Honors Multimodal Composition (C)

SLN 14767 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Students must enroll in the Honors section (182 K) to earn Honors credit

This course will fulfill one Honors "Additional Any" course requirement and the UW Composition requirement

Incoming Freshmen Only, seats will be distributed throughout summer

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Contact Nadra (fredjn@uw.edu) if not able to register automatically.

Multimodal: Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres

Explicit focus on how multimodal elements of writing–words, images, sound, design, etc.– work together to produce meaning. Additional course information coming soon!

H-Science (13)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NW, W)

SLN 16394 (View UW registration info »)

Oliver Fraser (Astronomy)
Office: PAB C324, Box 351580
Email: ojf@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
Storytelling is ancient, effective, and satisfying, but using stories to communicate the nuances and ambiguities of science can be a challenge. In this course students will craft presentations that reflect their personal interests in nature and science, and in doing so they will learn how to effectively explain their own work, helping them develop into experts in their field. The class is centered around two presentations of a scientific nature, as well as a mythic storytelling assignment intended to develop storytelling skills. You will work closely in small groups to develop your presentation, delivered on days set aside for this purpose.

HONORS 220 B: Evolution and Human Behavior

HONORS 220 B: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW, W)

SLN 16395 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these: Why are women and men different? Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy? Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children? When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why? What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior. 
  • Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.  *Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals. 
  • Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 220 C: Evolution and Human Behavior

HONORS 220 C: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW, W)

SLN 16396 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these: Why are women and men different? Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy? Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children? When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why? What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior. 
  • Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.  *Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals. 
  • Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 220 D: Science and Engineering for Social Justice

HONORS 220 D: Science and Engineering for Social Justice (NW, DIV, W)

SLN 16397 (View UW registration info »)

Dianne Hendricks (Bioengineering; HCDE)
Phone: 206-685-9283
Email: dgh5@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

In this course, we will explore social justice in a science and engineering context, with a focus on DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion). We will discover why scientists and engineers must practice inclusive design and think broadly about the impact of their work on diverse populations, including ethical implications, potential inequities in access, and bias against underrepresented people.

We emphasize what students can do to advocate for and represent diverse peoples, and to promote social justice through science and engineering practice. Throughout the course, we explore these inter-related questions:

  1. How do our cultural ideas about race, gender, disability and sexuality influence science and engineering knowledge and practice?
  2. On the other hand, how does our science and engineering practice influence our cultural ideas about race, gender, disability and sexuality?
  3. How can we use science and engineering to promote social justice for all people? 

Through a social justice lens, we will explore the ethical implications involved in how technologies impact underrepresented people with specific focus on race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Topics include:

  1. Current innovations and emerging technologies, such as: artificial intelligence, CRISPR genome editing, and DNA forensics;
  2. Processes involved in a variety of engineering disciplines, such as: sustainable technology, energy production and storage, hazardous waste disposal, and pharmaceutical and vaccine development;
  3. Interdisciplinary methodologies to work towards eliminating inequities, bias, and barriers, such as: inclusive design (e.g., curb cuts to allow wheelchair access on sidewalks and representative standards in transit, automotive, airline, and medical contexts); and increasing access to healthcare, technology, participation in government and elections, and infrastructure (clean water, energy, sanitation, and transportation).
Students are expected to put their science and engineering knowledge into a social justice context. Students will explore the  impact of science and engineering in society through weekly readings, written reflections, class discussions, and in-class debates. In addition, students complete an individual final paper and a team project in which they design a scientific or engineering solution that promotes social justice.

No prerequisite. All majors welcome!

HONORS 220 E: The Robots are Coming! Or are They? A Deep Dive into Advances in Artificial Intelligence

HONORS 220 E: The Robots are Coming! Or are They? A Deep Dive into Advances in Artificial Intelligence (NW, W)

SLN 23102 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Freeman (Physics)
Email: rrfree@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Explore the recent history of the dramatic advances in artificial intelligence science and robot technology and their impacts on our culture and lives. Research the extent that robots and computers have freed whole swaths of jobs and occupations from the necessity of human involvement. Attempt to understand the current reach of “machine thought” or A.I., and try to make realistic predictions of where this science/technology is likely to lead. Finally, we will confront the question of whether we are witnessing the beginning of the end of the central role of humans in the future of civilization: That is, while we will (hopefully) be around to experience the future, we may not necessarily be in control.

The course will involve wide ranging readings on the impact of automation/robots in our economy, and the effects, good and bad, on our economy. We will explore the question of whether machine thought will advance to the critical point of machines being able to design and build the next generation of “machine thinkers”. Most importantly, we need to address the question of whether there is anything about being a human that ultimately a (very advanced) machine cannot do much better.

The goal to explore the vast resources of the internet, and the ideas presented in our entertainment media and contrast and compare these results with academic research on the same subjects. Is the hype real, or is it simply a product of our culture’s current obsession with what is trending?

This is a course for students who have always been fascinated with the rapid advance in technology, and find themselves wondering if the ever increasing pace of technological advancement is necessarily always a good thing.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NW)

SLN 11477 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 BIOL/CHEM GPA.

CONTACT ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU
TO ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12481 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 96 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either MATH 124 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; score of 66% on HCHEMC placement test, score of 3, 4 or 5 on AP Chemistry exam, or IB score of 5, 6, or 7 on high level chemistry exam.

Students must also register for CHEM 145 AA, AB, AC, or AD.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

$75 course fee

CHEM 145 and CHEM 155 cover material in CHEM 142, CHEM 152, and CHEM 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 142, CHEM145 (5 credits); CHEM 145, CHEM 155, CHEM 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12605 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 70 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 221, CHEM 223, CHEM 237, CHEM 335.

CSE 142: Computer Programming I

CSE 142: Computer Programming I (NW)

SLN 13428 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (CSE142@UW.EDU) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 HA section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 142 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

See CSE Time Schedule (https://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/AUT2020/cse.html) for course days, times and SLNs for both CSE 142 and CSE 390.

Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

CSE 143: Computer Programming II

CSE 143: Computer Programming II (NW)

SLN 13429 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5+1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (CSE143@UW.EDU) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 143 lecture A, D, or X
2. corresponding CSE 143 quiz section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. corresponding CSE 390 HB section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 142 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

See CSE Time Schedule (https://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/AUT2020/cse.html) for course days, times and SLNs for both CSE 143 and CSE 390.

Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)

SLN 18072 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

REGISTRATION INFORMATION AVAILABLE:
HTTPS://MATH.WASHINGTON.EDU/
REGISTRATION-INFORMATION#MATH134

Covers the material of MATH 124, MATH 125, MATH 126; MATH 307, MATH 308. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for MATH 124 after taking MATH 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NW)

SLN 18152 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 45 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 136, or minimum grade of 3.0 in all MATH 126 and MATH 307 and MATH 308.

Please contact advising@math.washington.edu if you have questions about this course.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 141 A: Honors Mechanics

PHYS 141 A: Honors Mechanics (NW)

SLN 20394 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 44 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either a minimum grade of 2.5 in MATH 124, MATH 134, which may be taken concurrently, a minimum score of 4 on the AP Calculus AB exam, or a minimum score of 3 on the AP Calculus BC exam; recommended: high school-level physics course.

Addresses same material as PHYS 121 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 114, PHYS 117, PHYS 121, and PHYS 141. 

H-Social Sciences (4)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 230 B: The Record of Us All: The Past, Present and Future of the Human Record

HONORS 230 B: The Record of Us All: The Past, Present and Future of the Human Record (I&S, W)

SLN 16399 (View UW registration info »)

Joseph Janes (Information School)
Office: MGH 330 M, Box 352840
Phone: 206-616-0987
Email: jwj@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

8 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

Every day – for that matter, potentially for every minute or second of every day – we interact with a widening variety of information objects, from the trivial to the profound. All of those form part of the human record, the record of who we are as individuals and who we are as a society. That record goes back thousands of years and is our only way of knowing, understanding and remembering days and people gone by, and in turn is the only way we and our world will be known and remembered. This course will explore that record in its various forms, how it got that way, what makes it work, what is and might be happening to it, and what that might mean going forward. Students will know more about the various types of records: public, private and published, the life cycle of information, including specific examples and the questions they raise, the importance of social context and roles, power and work, as well as the institutions that work to create, organize, preserve and provide access. Finally, we’ll look at the future of an increasingly documented world and its implications.

HONORS 230 C: Play and Material Cultures

HONORS 230 C: Play and Material Cultures (I&S, W)

SLN 16400 (View UW registration info »)

Jonathan Lee (Comparative History of Ideas)
Email: jreylee@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

20 seats reserved for incoming freshmen

General introductions to material cultures studies, toy studies, board game studies as sister disciplines all engaged in the social life of objects. 

HONORS 230 D: History of the Social Sciences

HONORS 230 D: History of the Social Sciences (I&S, W)

SLN 16401 (View UW registration info »)

Daniel Bessner (Jackson School of International Studies)
Phone: (206) 685-1043
Email: dbessner@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

8 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

This course explores the history of the social sciences from their advent in the nineteenth century until today, with a focus on the twentieth century. Social sciences examined include economics, psychology, history, sociology, anthropology, and others.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (I&S)

SLN 17277 (View UW registration info »)

Theodore Myhre (School of Law)
Phone: 206-685-7914
Email: tmyhre@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code required to register. Contact Nadra at fredjn@uw.edu for add code.

Students must register for the Honors section of this course in order to receive Honors Additional Any credit.

5 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen.

Examines the structure of the American legal system and how laws are made. Surveys key doctrinal areas of the law learning fundamental legal concepts, and explore how the law functions and evolves over time, including legal issues and decision-making related to statutory or common law.

H-Interdisciplinary (5)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Additional Any requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Calderwood in Public Writing: Writing, Resistance, and the Prison State

HONORS 345 A: Calderwood in Public Writing: Writing, Resistance, and the Prison State (C, DIV)

SLN 16405 (View UW registration info »)

Brendan Goldman (Stroum Center for Jewish Studies)
Email: bgg213@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

How did America’s carceral institutions come to house over two million unwilling residents? What precipitated prisons’ central role in our society?

Prison have been a fixture among state institutions throughout recorded human history.  However, the form of the prison and the justifications for its existence have evolved markedly over the centuries and millennia. So too has the scale of carceral institutions and their relative importance to states’ penal systems.

In this course, we will examine the rise of modern prisons as a historical problem through the writings of Michel Foucault.  We will read firsthand accounts of lived experiences of incarceration from ancient Christians in the Roman Empire to Algerian Muslims under French colonial rule. We will interrogate how states have used prisons to marginalize minorities, control restive populations and delegitimize political activists. We will analyze prisoners’ memoirs, personal letters, political treatise and poems as sites of resistance to state power. Central to this course is developing students’ public writing skills. We will use these skills to document prisoners’ lives, translate academic articles about prisons into intelligible prose and advocate for prison reform (or abolition).

HONORS 392 A: Political Ecology of Death in the Anthropocene

HONORS 392 A: Political Ecology of Death in the Anthropocene (I&S / NW, W)

SLN 16406 (View UW registration info »)

Karen Liftin (Political Science)
Email: litfin@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 5 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

Note: this course will be jointly listed with POL S 401B.
Every living organism dies, as do ecosystems and species, thereby perpetuating the “circle of life.” One species, however, has developed the capacity to anticipate (and therefore dread) death and commandeer planetary life-support systems in service to its own growth. Humanity is now operating well outside the planetary boundaries that characterized the Holocene, the interglacial “sweet spot” during which civilization emerged. The implications are profound: not only are we facing the end of “nature” as something separate from human culture, we are also facing the possibility of civilizational death.  

We therefore ask ourselves: what are the political and ecological consequences of how individuals and societies approach death? While death is a fact of life, questions of who lives, who dies, who decides, and with what consequences are also political ones. Our discussion will therefore be informed by themes of justice, equity, power and authority, and political agency. At the same time, because mortality is also an intensely personal reality, we will deepen our self-inquiry through poetry, videos, contemplative practices, personal exploration, and political action.

 

HONORS 393 A: Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

HONORS 393 A: Rhetoric of Health and Medicine (VLPA / NW, W)

SLN 16407 (View UW registration info »)

Amanda Friz (Department of Communication)
Email: afriz@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

6 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen
What does it mean to be healthy? Why are some practices today considered to be healthy but were considered unhealthy in the past? What counts as an illness or disease, and why? Rather than a static quality one possesses or lacks, “health” is a practice, socially constructed and enacted via subtle rhetorical actions and social performances, informed by intersections of privilege and power. This course will take as our starting point how language and argument shape our understanding of health, how health is understood in relation to wellness, illness, and disability, and how the meaning of health has become a site of argument and controversy. Students will explore the role of language and culture in the creation of diagnoses, definitions and classifications of diseases, and treatment; our complex lived experiences with illness (physical and mental); the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and disability in experiences of illness and healing; and the role of activism and advocacy in healthcare. The course does not assume any background in science or medicine, but rather studies the political, ethical, and humanities-based aspects of medicine. One of our recurrent topics, in fact, will be to consider how non-experts interact with medicine and its technical vocabularies. Although the primary objective of the course is to understand the rhetorical and cultural dimensions of health and medicine, a secondary objective is for students to become more savvy patients and, for any students who hope to wield the stethoscope one day, more insightful and compassionate health care providers.

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (VLPA / I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 16408 (View UW registration info »)

Catherine Connors (Classics)
Office: Denny 262 B, Box 353110
Phone: 206- 543-2266
Email: cconnors@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

6 seats reserved for incoming freshmen
In this course we shall read and discuss ancient Greek and Roman sources on religion, philosophy, medicine and law along with modern scholarly analyses of ancient society to explore the roles of women in ancient Greek and Roman society. Our goals are: to acquire a strong familiarity through analysis of primary sources with the features of social and civic life in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to gain a critical awareness of scholarly analysis of the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to reflect on the beliefs, policies and actions that shaped and constrained the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world and how these issues can be understood in relation to issues of gender, class and status in modern contexts.

HONORS 394 B: Music and Community Artivism

HONORS 394 B: Music and Community Artivism (VLPA / I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 16409 (View UW registration info »)

Marisol Berrios-Miranda (Music)
Email: marisolbmd1@yahoo.com

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

8 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen

This course will focus on music as a community-building practice. Through readings, listening, discussion, and music-making we will consider questions about the social functions of music-making, explore the corresponding aesthetics and skills, and make case studies of activist uses of music historically and in the present.  We will have presentations by people from local community music groups, and students will visit community sites to observe and participate.                                          

You must attend at least 5 events at community arts sites off-campus (a list of community arts groups for ideas will be provided). 

 

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16359 (View UW registration info »)

Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu
Nadra Fredj (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 140 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to: – Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do; – Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and – Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16375 (View UW registration info »)

Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu
Nadra Fredj (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 140 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to: – Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do; – Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and – Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

Special Topics (2)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 397 A: Peer Educator Seminar

HONORS 397 A: Peer Educator Seminar (I&S)

SLN 16410 (View UW registration info »)

Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu
Nadra Fredj (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 2
Limit: 25 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

For 2020 Peer Educators Only

HONORS 397 B: Human/Transhuman/Posthuman

HONORS 397 B: Human/Transhuman/Posthuman (I&S, W)

SLN 23103 (View UW registration info »)

John (Jack) Whelan (Foster School of Business)
Email: jwhelan@uw.edu

Credits: 2, c/nc
Limit: 15 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

NOTE: this is a 2 credit course so will only count towards UW general education requirements, not Honors core curriculum.

This course is as a continuation of Honors 394: “The Disenchantment of the West: From Shakespeare to the Coen Brothers” but can be taken without Honors 394 as a prerequisite. If the “Disenchantment” course seeks to provide the broad sweep of thinking and creative imagination that has shaped the social imaginary of the West over the last several centuries, the “Human” course seeks to drill down into the thought and imagination of the post-World War II era to the present. The themes developed in this course build on themes developed in “Disenchantment” but are concerned to explore in greater detail changing ideas about human identity as well as changing ideas about humanity as a species. The themes for each week are listed below. The course will give students the opportunity to engage with the work of a wide variety of thinkers and artists so that they might become acquainted with the dynamic cultural landscape that is profoundly changing our ideas of the human. The instructor will provide background information and resources to acquaint students with the different perspectives they will encounter, but the main goal of the course will be to provide an opportunity for lively discussion around a topic that is of central concern for all thoughtful human beings: What do you think it means to be human? This is a profoundly important question for students engaged in business, engineering, computer science, and the natural sciences to consider since the work they will be doing in their disciplines will have enormous consequences in shaping the answer to this question.

The class will meet twice a week for 90-minute sessions. This is a credit/no credit class that will require modest level of reading and a final “reflection” paper to provide students with the opportunity to integrate themes developed in the class with concerns relevant to them.