University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Winter 2021

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will either respond with an add code or confirmation we were able to add you to the course directly.

H-Arts & Humanities (5)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 211 A: The Politics and Practice of Making: Art as a Tool for Creating Change

HONORS 211 A: The Politics and Practice of Making: Art as a Tool for Creating Change (VLPA, W)

SLN 15420 (View UW registration info »)

Timea Tihanyi (Art)
Email: timea@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

This hands-on studio art course explores the creative practice as a political act. We will retrace the story of 3 historic milestones in the contemporary visual art: Black Mountain College, a revolutionary art school in the early part of the 20th century; the impact of textile practices on the artworld during the social movements of 1960-80’s; and emerging DIY/hacker practices in our contemporary techno-culture.

Through one in-depth research project and one hands-on making project, we will explore the web of connections between the political and the personal, technology and tradition, design, craft, and collaboration. We will consider interdisciplinary maker-culture both through individual personal narratives of the makers and in the larger cultural, political, and socio-economical context of our world.

The course is OFFERED VIA REMOTE LEARNING, but will meet synchronously to maximize our connected hands-on learning experience and feedback from peers and the instructor. During our class meeting times, expect lively discussions in small and large groups, demos of making processes, various guest speakers from the art world, virtual field-trips during which we encounter a variety of art, cultural and social spaces. The outcome of this class is a co-authored e-book (culmination of research on practicioners whose work promotes positive change) and one personal artwork. 

There are no textbooks required for the class. All readings will be provided online through the UW Library System and Canvas. Students will be asked to provide a basic set of art materials and tools for their personal art project. Expect to spend $10-40 on those, depending on your project idea, the scope of the project, and already available resources.  

HONORS 211 B: Reading Romance in the Middle Ages

HONORS 211 B: Reading Romance in the Middle Ages (VLPA, W)

SLN 15421 (View UW registration info »)

Beatrice Arduini (French and Italian Studies)
Office: PDL C-249, Box 354361
Phone: (206) 616-9560
Email: barduini@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

What is a medieval manuscript? How was the act of reading different in the medieval period? This course examines what a medieval manuscript typically consisted of and explores a broad and diverse manuscript culture and reading culture particularly in Italy, France and Spain in the Middle Ages. At a time of digital transformation, medieval manuscripts give us cause to consider the ways in which the book as a medium served to shape the modern experience of reading. We will explore how manuscripts were produced, presented, exchanged and read as symbols of authority, access and authenticity. We will also consider how digital projects and open access editions enrich and advance scholarship on the tradition and the circulation of texts by sharing knowledge in an open, timely and accessible way.

HONORS 211 C: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome

HONORS 211 C: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome (VLPA, W)

SLN 15422 (View UW registration info »)

Michael Ritter (Classics)
Email: mritte@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

The transition from the Republic to the Imperial period in Roman history brought stability and a reprieve from generations of civil wars, but it also signaled a loss of rights. The central question of this course will be what the Romans ultimately gave up for this authoritarian stability and why. Through primary and secondary sources as well as archaeological evidence, we will use this period as a lens to investigate the curtailing of rights such as freedom of speech and democracy. Specifically, we will investigate the following trends and the role they played in the breakdown of the Republican system:

1. Civil War
2. Inequality
3. Cult of Personality
4. Imperialism

HONORS 241 C: Russian Crime Fiction

HONORS 241 C: Russian Crime Fiction (VLPA, W)

SLN 15429 (View UW registration info »)

Galya Diment (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: A219 Padelford Hall, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-6848
Email: galya@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

Must register for this section for Honors credit.

Honors students required to complete a longer mid-term, and either a longer final exam or a 10-12 page paper.

Introduces important trends and movements in Russian literary and cultural history.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

ENGL 182 H: Multimodal: Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres

ENGL 182 H: Multimodal: Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres (C)

SLN 14222 (View UW registration info »)

Erin Gilbert (English)
Email: eringil@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Offered via remote learning.
TTH 12:30-2:20

Counts for Honors "Additional Any" and UW Composition Requirement
Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Priority I Registration for Freshmen & Sophomore.

Entry codes are required for this course. To request a code please contact uwhonors@uw.edu.

English 182 focuses on teaching strategies and skills for effective writing and argument that are required of traditional academic genres, such as the research essay, while also expanding the skills for composing in multimodal genres that our increasingly digital and media saturated world demands.

H-Science (15)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 221 A: DNA and Evolution

HONORS 221 A: DNA and Evolution (NW, W)

SLN 15423 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

Students who have previously taken “DNA and Evolution” are not eligible to enroll in this course again. Additionally, students who have taken or are planning to take BIOL 354 with Professor Herron should not register for this course as there is significant overlap in material. Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations? Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions. Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs

HONORS 221 B: Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

HONORS 221 B: Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (NW, W)

SLN 15424 (View UW registration info »)

Kelly Hennessey (Biology)
Email: hennek@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

Emerging infectious diseases (IDs) are infections that have recently appeared within a population or those whose incidence or geographic range is rapidly increasing or threatens to increase in the near future. Emerging infections can be caused by: Previously undetected or unknown infectious agents Known agents that have spread to new geographic locations or new populations Previously known agents whose role in specific diseases has previously gone unrecognized. Re-emergence of agents whose incidence of disease had significantly declined in the past, but whose incidence of the disease has reappeared. This class of diseases is known as re-emerging infectious diseases.

This course will focus on an overview of the basic principles of infectious diseases (IDs) focusing on emerging and re-emerging IDs that affect public health in the U.S. and worldwide.

Topics include:

*Scope and nature of the problem of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (IDs).
*Factors involved in the emergence and re-emergence of IDs.
*Basic biology and epidemiology of selected emerging and re-emerging ID agents (bacteria, viruses, prions, helminths, and eukaryotic protozoans).
*Public health, economic, and social impact of emerging and re-emerging IDs.
*Compare strains of Sars-Cov-2 and other coronaviruses (SARS & MERS) and analyze pathogenicity based on amino acid variations.
*Work in research teams and use bioinformatics to elucidate variations in nucleotides sequences (changes in parts of the genome) of viruses associated with increased pathogenicity/virulence. *Predict the pathogenicity of future mutations and/or viruses that have yet to jump species.
*Strategies for diagnosis, prevention, and control of emerging and re-emerging IDs.

HONORS 221 C: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Math That Lies: Communicating Why Some Quantitative Arguments Are Misleading or Bogus

HONORS 221 C: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Math That Lies: Communicating Why Some Quantitative Arguments Are Misleading or Bogus (NW, W)

SLN 15425 (View UW registration info »)

Neal Koblitz (Mathematics)
Office: C-335 Padelford
Phone: 543-4386
Email: NULL

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

6 Honors students/ 6 Math students

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.
.

This will be a 5-credit seminar on public writing. Students will learn how to interrogate quantitative arguments and dubious uses of numerical data — in controversies regarding public health (COVID-19), race (redlining), education (value-added modeling), investment strategies (buying land), and other aspects of society. Each student will write five short pieces (such as a book review or op-ed), which will be edited by other students and further workshopped during class. Readings will consist of two books and several shorter pieces, including “Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil and a chapter of “How to Lie with Statistics” by Darrell Huff.

The goal will be to learn to write clearly and persuasively for a general readership about quantitative aspects of socially important controversies. The course is open to mathematical science majors as well as to students in any major in the Honors Program.

HONORS 221 E: Climate Extremes

HONORS 221 E: Climate Extremes (NW, W)

SLN 22235 (View UW registration info »)

Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
Phone: 206-543-8474
Email: paulj@uw.edu
Alex Gagnon (Oceanography)
Office: 409 OSB
Phone: (206) 543-5627
Email: gagnon@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS 221E IS A 5-CREDIT HONORS
SCIENCE COURSE, JOINTLY TAUGHT WITH
OCEAN 450.
HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR T
HONORS SECTION TO RECEIVE HONORS
CREDIT

To better understand the key factors that control the earth’s present and future climate, this course examines episodes in the earth’s past when extreme climate conditions existed. Dramatic changes in the earth’s climate have resulted from natural variations in solar insolation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, rates and pathways of ocean circulation, plate tectonics, and the evolution of vascular plants and, in modern times, the burning of fossil fuels. The impact of these factors on climate through interactions between the atmosphere, oceans and land will be evaluated. Using these lessons from the past, students will learn what currently controls climate on our planet and why dramatic climate changes occur. The processes that produced past climate changes will be discussed primarily as a framework to evaluate modern and future climate change resulting from human activity. The class will utilize lectures, in-class problem solving, discussion of scientific papers and weekly homework to learn the material on both a qualitative and quantitative level. Students are expected to have had sufficient science-based coursework to feel comfortable solving quantitative in-class and homework problems using basic algebra and, in some cases, using the spreadsheet program Excel.

Honors Project: Honors students will conduct individual literature research on a specific climate topic. The result of this individual research will be a succinct summary of a complex  climate issue written for a general audience, in the form of a “letter to the editor” which they  will contribute to a media source, including regional newspapers. More details about this  project and milestones will be provided to honors students.

 

HONORS 221D: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Science and society in a changing climate

HONORS 221D: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Science and society in a changing climate (NW, W)

SLN 21881 (View UW registration info »)

Michelle Koutnik (Earth and Space Sciences)
Phone: 206-221-5041
Email: mkoutnik@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

SLN: 21881
This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

Priority is given to juniors and seniors, but inquires of interest from all students are welcome.

Joint listed with ESS 490, SLN: 14764

6 Honors/6 ESS students. ESS students contact the instructor, Michelle Koutnik be placed on a waitlist, mkoutnik@uw.edu

In this course students will read and think about Arctic and Antarctic ice loss due to climate change and then distill these scientific articles, reports, films, or books into pieces of writing for non-scientists. This is a critical practice for scientists, but also for anyone who wants to write for the public and communicate broadly. Effective communication of science is vital to society. We all need to understand the implications of declines in snowpack, coastal erosion, Arctic sea-ice loss, Greenland ice melting and instability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The goal of this course is for students to gain experience writing in styles read by the public and on scientific topics that matter to everyone. As part of the class students will read, write, edit, and share perspectives about ice and climate change.

 

Priority is given to juniors and seniors, but inquires of interest from all students are welcome. Students from majors and minors in the College of the Environment will be able to apply their scientific background to this process, but all motivated students are eligible to enroll.

 

 

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOCHEM 451 A: Honors Biochem

BIOCHEM 451 A: Honors Biochem (NW)

SLN 11305 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

Offered via remote learning

Minimum of a 3.0 in BIOC 450 or 3.5 in BIOC 440
Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu to enroll
Add Code required

BIOC 451 is the honors version of BIOC 441; it covers the same topics in metabolism and gene expression using the same textbook, but is taught as a group discussion of selected publications from the primary literature, with an emphasis on research strategy, experimental design, creative thinking, and scientific communication.

CHEM 155: Honors General Chemistry

CHEM 155: Honors General Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12182 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 72 students

Honors Credit Type

Offered via remote learning.

Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for registration questions

Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

$75 course fee – auditors exempt
Fee purpose: Lab
LAB SECTIONS CANNOT BE OVERLOADED.
NO WAITLISTS. VISIT NOTIFY.UW.EDU.

Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 336: Honors Organic Chemistry

CHEM 336: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12324 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 72 students

Honors Credit Type

Offered via remote learning
Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for registration questions
Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.

For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

CHEM 346: Organic Chemistry Honors Laboratory

CHEM 346: Organic Chemistry Honors Laboratory (NW)

SLN 12325 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 3
Limit: 24 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

Contact Chemistry for add codes.
Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.
Students who do not complete the prerequisites will be dropped from this course.
$75 course fee – auditors exempt
Fee purpose: Lab
LAB SECTIONS CANNOT BE OVERLOADED.
NO WAITLISTS. VISIT NOTIFY.UW.EDU.
—————————
OFFERED VIA REMOTE LEARNING

To accompany CHEM 336. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 241, CHEM 346 (3 credits).

CHEM 346 AA LB: Organic Chemistry Honors Lab

CHEM 346 AA LB: Organic Chemistry Honors Lab (NW)

SLN 12326 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 3
Limit: 24 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

Offered via remote learning

Students who do not complete the prerequisites will be dropped from this course.
Honors
Lab Section

To accompany CHEM 336. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 241, CHEM 346 (3 credits). Prerequisite: 1.7 in CHEM 335; minimum 1.7 grade in CHEM 336, which may be taken concurrently. Offered: W.

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I (NW)

SLN 13018 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Contact/Visit CSE Advising to Register
Offered via remote learning

Honors
Credit/No Credit
CSE 142 STUDENTS REGISTER FOR
CSE 390 H & HA

To earn Honors credit, students must register for and complete ALL of the following:

  1. Register for CSE 142 lecture A or B AND a corresponding CSE 142 section
  2. Register for CSE 390 H lecture AND corresponding CSE 390 HA section

(See Time Schedule/MyPlan for course day, time and SLN for both CSE 142 and CSE 390)

CSE 142 will cover basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects. The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

CSE 143 with CSE 390 HB: Computer Programming II

CSE 143 with CSE 390 HB: Computer Programming II (NW)

SLN 13020 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5+1
Limit: 24 students

Honors Credit Type

Offered via remote learning
Prerequisite: CSE 142
Contact CSE Advising to Register
CSE 143 was recently changed to 5 credits so the additional seminar will be 6 credits total.

To earn Honors credit, students must register for and complete ALL of the following:

  1. Register for CSE 143 lecture A or B AND a corresponding CSE 143 section
  2. Register for CSE 390 H lecture AND corresponding CSE 390 HB section

(See Time Schedule/MyPlan for course day, time and SLN for both CSE 143 and CSE 390)

CSE 143 is a continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. 

The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

MATH 135: Accelerated Honors Calculus

MATH 135: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)

SLN 17019 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department.
Students must have completed or be in Honors MATH 134.

Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 335: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus

MATH 335: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NW)

SLN 17097 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 334.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 334. Offered: W.

PHYS 142: Honors Electromagnetism

PHYS 142: Honors Electromagnetism (NW)

SLN 19199 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 44 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION AND ASSOCIATED QUIZ SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

See Physics department for more information and review their Honors Physics 142 and the Honors Physics overview pages:
https://phys.washington.edu/courses/2021/winter/phys/142a
https://phys.washington.edu/141-142-143-courses

Addresses same material as PHYS 122 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 115, PHYS 118, PHYS 122, and PHYS 142. Prerequisite: a minimum grade of 2.5 in PHYS 141; and MATH 125 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; recommended: high-school-level physics course. Offered: W.

H-Social Sciences (4)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 231 A: Making All the Difference: Gender, Disability and Law

HONORS 231 A: Making All the Difference: Gender, Disability and Law (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15426 (View UW registration info »)

Megan McCloskey (Law School; Law Societies and Justice)
Email: meganmc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is the first international human rights treaty to recognize the potential for intersectional discrimination, in that case discrimination against women and girls with disabilities. Yet even though the Convention calls for targeted action to advance the rights of women and girls with disabilities and prohibits discrimination against them, research has shown that such discrimination remains endemic. Worldwide, women and girls with disabilities are less likely than their male peers with disabilities to attend school, to hold formal employment, and to be literate. They are more likely to live in poverty and to be subjected to gender-based violence, both as children and adults. Indeed, gender inequality remains more pervasive across societies than any other form of inequality and is more pervasive across groups within societies than any other form of inequality.

This course asks: What explains the persistent exclusion of women and girls with disabilities from civic, social, and economic spaces in their communities? How and when do law and policy reinforce that exclusion or offer pathways forward? The course is designed to critically engage legal theories, and theoretical approaches to gender, disability and global human rights practice in order to assess how human rights law and practices at the international and national level address the rights of women with disabilities. The course is intended to complement and build on existing coursework in LSJ and other departments on international human rights, disability studies, and gender and feminist studies, but will provide sufficient overview that no prerequisites are necessary. We will spend some time exploring core theoretical concepts before applying those concepts to contemporary problems. In particular, the course will encourage students to think critically about law and policy, particularly within human rights systems, and analyze how those systems may re-create or perpetuate inequalities and marginalization even while promising a more just future.

We will take a practice-oriented approach and engage in exercises that will familiarize students with advocacy tools like opinion writing as well as position statements and critical policy analyses. We will also engage with social movement actors and advocates and learn how they approach making human rights a reality for all.

HONORS 231 B: LGBTI Rights in International Affairs

HONORS 231 B: LGBTI Rights in International Affairs (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15427 (View UW registration info »)

Elise Rainer (Scandinavian Studies)
Email: eacr@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered via remote learning with a hybrid of synchronously and asynchronous sessions.

LGBTI rights in foreign policy represent the evolution of a principle in human rights that formerly did not impact international affairs. Promoting LGBTI rights in foreign policy introduces a new set of principles and moral standards that regulate international relations according to emerging human rights norms. International relations are now reevaluated due to new standards, such as the U.S. and Sweden’s bilateral relationships with Uganda. During this course, students will examine the intense global debate over LGBTI equality norms within a global and domestic context; how human rights concepts evolve, strategies of social movements, as well as how states influence one another. The goal of this course is for students to understand why and how LGBTI rights were introduced into some nations’ foreign policies. What were the catalysts to institutionalize sexual minority rights into the respective foreign policies? The course will examine differences in social mobilizations and in particular the role of NGOs, insider governmental allies, national interest, transnational activists, and sensitizing events for same sex relations globally, as central factors for developing respective foreign policy agendas. Students will investigate the varying strategies civil society groups and leaders have, and continue, to employ in order to influence institutional change across cultures and global regions. Students will focus first on human rights norm entrepreneur nations. Specifically, social movements in Scandinavia that have led to reforms internationally on LGBTI equality. Next, students will analyze human rights in countries such as the United States, where human rights in foreign policy at times presents a paradox when compared to its domestic human rights record. Students will engage with leading American and international activists. Through guest speakers, group projects, and simulations students will gain experiential learning of human rights advocacy.

HONORS 231 C: Abolishing Poverty: shelter, mutual aid and care

HONORS 231 C: Abolishing Poverty: shelter, mutual aid and care (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15428 (View UW registration info »)

Victoria Lawson (Geography; Honors Program)
Phone: 206-543-5196
Email: lawson@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 18 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

We will unlearn poverty and homelessness as framed in popular discourse and public policy. We will learn the recent history of homelessness in Seattle and explore root causes of impoverishment — both socio-economic processes and representations that frame people and places as ‘poor’. We will explore the role of the non-poor and structural causes in the production of poverty/inequality. In our course we will ethically engage with unhoused people and homelessness activists that are addressing the immediate and root causes of homelessness. We will engage with Tent City 3 which will be on campus during winter quarter. We will work on understanding root causes of homelessness in Seattle, considering the role of intersecting forms of oppression and discrimination (race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship and more), criminalization and state-sponsored violence. Throughout our class, we will consider mutual aid forms of shelter, such as Tent City 3 and the tiny homes movement to think through forms engagement, research and action that collectively address impoverishment.

 

 

HONORS 397 A: Solving Problems in Museum Spaces

HONORS 397 A: Solving Problems in Museum Spaces (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15437 (View UW registration info »)

Angie Ong (Museology; Information School)
Office: Alumni House (AHO), Room 308, Box 354861
Phone: 206-221-0763
Email: aong@uw.edu

Credits: 3
Limit: 12 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

COMBINED 5 CREDIT COURSE
This is the first part of a two part course series. Students must enroll in the corresponding 2-credit, Spring 2021 seminar to earn 5 credits of Honors Social Science.

synchronous remote learning with asynchronous components

As museums strive to establish relevant roles in their communities, they seek out innovative ways to connect to and serve a diverse and ever-changing population. At their core, museums provide boundless opportunities for learning and engagement and are robust environments that enable students to explore issues such as cultural relevance, social justice, equity and access, health and wellbeing, community engagement, and technology impact.

In this course, UW Honors students will work with Museology graduate students in conducting research studies or developing projects that address these important museum issues. This small-team collaboration will involve ideation, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of a master’s thesis research study or project. The course aims to establish a positive, productive, and mutually beneficial connection between undergraduate and graduate student cohorts and demonstrate the strength of interdisciplinary experiences, shared expertise, and collaborative learning.

Enrollment requires a two-quarter commitment (Winter and Spring 2021) as students will work to complete a final thesis product. No prerequisite required. We value the diversity of experiences and expertise of students interested in the cultural/nonprofit sector.

WATCH MY VIDEO for more about this course.
Learn more about the Museology Graduate Program at: https://www.washington.edu/museology/

H-Interdisciplinary (6)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Additional Any requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Interdisciplinary Research Writing

HONORS 345 A: Interdisciplinary Research Writing (C)

SLN 15430 (View UW registration info »)

Jonathan Lee (Comparative History of Ideas)
Email: jreylee@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning with some asynchronous components.

This workshop-based course guides students from all disciplines through the methods and processes of interdisciplinary research writing. Students will work together in small scholarly communities, supporting their peers’ ongoing research as they explore related topics within the interdisciplinary field of popular culture and media studies. This research culminates in the writing of a scholarly journal article based on guidelines from real-world scholarly journal publication.

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Writing Food and Politics

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Writing Food and Politics (C, DIV)

SLN 15431 (View UW registration info »)

Damarys Espinoza (Anthropology)
Email: damarys@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman ever elected to U.S. Congress recently stated that she learned her most important political lessons from working in restaurants. This class looks at food as the nexus of almost all the major forces in U.S. politics today. We will examine food as it is connected to issues such as Indigenous sovereignty, climate justice, immigration law, the criminal justice system, workers’ rights and health. We will explore these topics through an interdisciplinary and decolonial approach to critical food studies. Our examination centers the scholarship and lived experiences of Indigenous peoples and communities of color. This class will help you develop skills to communicate publicly about the specific role that food plays in contemporary U.S. politics and social movements.

HONORS 391 A: Race, Gender, Diaspora & Population Health

HONORS 391 A: Race, Gender, Diaspora & Population Health (VLPA / I&S / NW, DIV, W)

SLN 15432 (View UW registration info »)

Clarence Spigner (Health Services)
Office: H-692 Health Sciences Building, Box 357660
Phone: 206 616-2948
Email: cspigner@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

Course Description: This 300-level 5-credit course explores the health of populations across the planet. Multiculturalism and the Problem Based Learning (PBL) allow students to investigate inequalities in health. More than 35 open-ended topics or cases include sex-worker rights, white saviors, Ebola, anti-immigration policies, #MeToo, incarceration, female circumcision, racial admixture, and LGBTQ issues. Randomly selected cohorts of 3-4 students investigate and present on a randomly selected cases / topics. Also, a 5-7 page, typewritten double-spaced essay of a critically read book, essay of short story from a reading list more than 40 titles. 

Objectives:
1. Understand the intersectionality of race and gender in population health.
2. Assess knowledge about diasporic populations.
3. Discern social, physical and emotional health in popular literature.

HONORS 394 A: Ways of Feeling: Universal and culture specific expression of emotion

HONORS 394 A: Ways of Feeling: Universal and culture specific expression of emotion (VLPA / I&S, W)

SLN 15433 (View UW registration info »)

Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: Padelford A217, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-7691
Email: dziwirek@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.

The key questions that are addressed in the Ways of Feeling class are: • Are there “emotional universals”, that is, feelings that all people share independent of language, culture, gender, and race? and • Are there “culture-specific” emotions? • Are there “gender-specific” emotions? The class is suitable for all students who are interested in Language, languages, and meaning. Ways of Feeling is a comparative course, with enough Slavic content for it to be relevant for Slavic majors and graduate students, yet accessible to those interested in other languages. Students will be introduced to research methods in semantics, pragmatics and discourse, and will be required to produce a thorough examination of underlying conceptualizations and a semantic analysis of a linguistic expression of emotion in a language of their choice. They will gain an appreciation of the social and cultural underpinnings of their own language and other languages.

Honors students:

Term paper (7-10 pages) INSTEAD OF SHORT PAPER #5: Honors students will work with the instructor to plan the final term paper. The final project includes an oral presentation of your research with handout.

HONORS 394 B: Love and Theft: Performing Race in American Literature and Culture

HONORS 394 B: Love and Theft: Performing Race in American Literature and Culture (VLPA / I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15434 (View UW registration info »)

Jang Wook Huh (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: jwhuh@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered via remote learning with a hybrid of synchronously and asynchronous sessions.

This course examines issues of cultural appreciation and appropriation within the context of comparative racial formation. We will close read literary and cultural texts on racial performance, including fiction, drama, photography, film, and music. Questions to be considered are: How do we “perform” race? How do our expressions of an identity present race as a legible index and produce it as a performative state? What kind of intimate sociality and sociability do our cross-racial acts articulate and at the same time disavow? How could we redress racial violence in the practice of cultural borrowing? We will also explore the global migration of American notions of race, as seen, for example, in K-Pop music videos and Japanese fashion. Readings may include work by David Henry Hwang, Nella Larsen, Anna Deavere Smith, and Kenji Yoshino, along with secondary scholarship by Judith Butler, Shilpa Davé, Eric Lott, and Richard Schechner. This course is open to students from all majors. No prerequisites are required, just an open mind.

HONORS 394 C: The Disenchantment of the West: From Shakespeare to the Coen Brothers

HONORS 394 C: The Disenchantment of the West: From Shakespeare to the Coen Brothers (VLPA / I&S, W)

SLN 15435 (View UW registration info »)

John (Jack) Whelan (Foster School of Business)
Email: jwhelan@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This course is offered synchronously via remote learning.
Are we still moderns in our thinking and imaginations? Or are we morphing into something that is postmodern? What do those terms even mean? Why do many of the ideals and values that shaped the modern grand narrative—humanism, rationality, objective truth, progress, universal human rights—seem to be under a withering assault in different ways from both the cultural Right and Left?

Only through history do we acquire a true knowledge of ourselves. This course is designed to help students become more aware of the forces that otherwise unconsciously impinge on them to shape the narratives that give their lives meaning—or don’t. It will do so by looking at the remarkable social transformation that Northern Atlantic Societies underwent since the Renaissance and Reformation.

This course is in part about the history of ideas, but seeks more to trace the way the imagination of what we think is real and unreal has changed over the last millennium. This course will seek to understand the intellectual, economic, religious, and artistic/imaginative forces that drove this transformation. Lectures will provide necessary historical and conceptual background. Optional out-of-class film viewing will be scheduled, and time will be apportioned each week for discussion to hash through the themes and materials presented each week. Coursepack readings and films will be used to bring these ideas down to earth in such a way that we can contrast how people imagined the world hundred years ago with the way we imagine it now.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15438 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered via remote learning with a hybrid of synchronously and asynchronous sessions.

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines.

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15439 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course is offered via remote learning with a hybrid of synchronously and asynchronous sessions.

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines.

Special Topics (1)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 396A: How Stuff Works: The Science Course for a Modern World

HONORS 396A: How Stuff Works: The Science Course for a Modern World (NW, W)

SLN 15436 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Freeman (Physics)
Email: rrfree@uw.edu

Credits: 3, c/nc
Limit: 15 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

Meets once week on Tuesdays, 12:30-3:20, synchronous Zoom.
Credit/no credit
Honors elective
Instructor: Dr. Rick Freeman, Physics

Have you always had a curiosity about how the technology you use and depend upon works? Have you been frustrated by the opaqueness of explanations on the web that almost always seem to depend upon your having a background in physics (and your experience with physics courses was, frankly, terrible)?  Would you like to understand the basic concepts that govern virtually everything, from why there are two high tides a day, to how GPS pinpoints your location, or to how a violin produces its sound? Would you like to understanding how the internet works, or for that matter, how a cell phone can connect you to virtually any person in the world while you are speeding down I5?

This course provides a survey of the fundamental physical concepts that undergird our modern technological society and is intended for non-science majors who are eager to build upon their natural curiosity of the technological world surrounding them to achieve a level of understanding that will serve them throughout their lives.

This course will use the extremely popular text How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life by L.A. Bloomfield of the University of Virginia, with examples and applications determined by the class.  We will make heavy use of the web, developing methodologies to parse useful understandings from the noise contained in its immense resources.  Students will learn to prepare PPT presentations that are clear expositions of specific examples of “how things work” and in doing so become a resource for their own education and for those around them.

The course is limited to 15 students in order to facilitate a high degree of class discussion, even in a ZOOM environment.  No background in mathematics and/or physics needed.