University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Winter 2023

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

Honors Arts & Humanities (5)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 211 A: The Disenchantment of the West: From Shakespeare to the Coen Brothers (A&H, W)

HONORS 211 A: The Disenchantment of the West: From Shakespeare to the Coen Brothers (A&H, W)

SLN 15661 (View UW registration info »)

John (Jack) Whelan (Foster School of Business)
Email: jwhelan@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

will be offered MW 3:30-5:20pm. Time Schedule is incorrect. class will be unlocked once corrected.

This is a course that is in part about the history of ideas, but seeks more to trace the way the imagination of what we think is real and unreal has changed over the last five hundred years, particularly in North Atlantic societies. This is a story that is more complex and interesting than simply to assume that science/rationality as it learned more about how the phenomenal world works supplanted religion/superstition and displaced the naive explanations for just about everything our premodern ancestors believed was true. This point of view is commonplace, but I would argue is simplistic and reductive.

 

This course will seek to understand some of the intellectual, economic, religious, and artistic/imaginative forces that drove this transformation. We will start some excerpts from The Romance of the Rose and Dante, then to artist and thinkers influenced by Ficino’s Florentine Platonic Academy. The goal here is to establish for students some sense of what it meant to think in a premodern enchanted milieu so that it might be contrasted with the modern disenchanted milieu they take for granted. We will spend some time with Shakespeare as a figure who was very much influenced by the traditions of premodern enchantment while at the same time being a transitional figure to a modern, disenchanted imagination of the world. We’ll look at how the intellectual and imaginative projects of the Renaissance and the Reformation influenced him, and how they shaped the concerns he sought to portray in his plays, particularly the comedies, but ending with a deep dive into King Lear.

 

From the Renaissance, we will discuss the secularizing impact of the Reformation, particularly Calvinism, the Wars of Religion, and the Enlightenment. We’ll then spend some time with the imaginative work of F. Schiller, S.T. Coleridge, Wm. Wordsworth, and P.B Shelley as representative figures. We will look at how the post-Kantian German idealists-Herder, Schelling, Fichte-in reaction to the overly rationalistic, disenchanting, objectifying and alienating effect of the Enlightenment projects provided the intellectual framework for them to channel the irrational, to celebrate the Self, and to overcome the deepening sense of fragmentation and alienation that accompanied the first stages of the Industrial revolution.

 

In the third phase, we will move into post WWII literature, film, and philosophy. We’ll give an overview of post-Nietzschean Western philosophy and its impact on the imagination of particularly Americans in the post-world War II through post 9/11 era.

 

Since any one of these topics could be a course in itself, the main thrust of this course is to give students an overview of the most important ideas over the last 500 years as they have influenced the Western secularizing imagination of reality. The goal is to help students to understand how these thinkers and artists have contributed to the way they think and experience the world, whether they are aware of their influence or not. Students will be required to know the texts excerpted from larger works that will be made available in a substantial coursepack, and then select a particular era to do a deeper dive and work from materials provided in lecture and discussion groups.

We will use Charles Taylor’s ‘A Secular Age’ (Harvard University Press, 2007) to provide the conceptual framework that tells the story of how the ‘social imaginary’, particularly in North Atlantic societies, morphed from what he describes as premodern imaginaries that were enchanted, i.e., an imagined world full of spirits and spiritual forces, to a modern one that became  profoundly disenchanted, that is following Weber, a world that has lost any robust collective or public sense of the sacred.

The course explores the hypothesis that figures like Shakespeare and the Coens  are transitional artists for their different times: Shakespeare for the transition from the premodern to the modern, the Coens for the transition from the modern to whatever comes next.

This course is in part about the history of ideas, but seeks more to trace the way the imagination of what we think is real and unreal has changed over the last millennium. This course will seek to understand  the intellectual, economic, religious, and artistic/imaginative forces that drove this transformation. Lectures will provide necessary historical and conceptual background. Optional out-of-class film viewing will be scheduled, and time will be apportioned each week for  discussion to hash through the themes and materials presented each week. Coursepack readings and films will be used to bring these ideas down to earth in such a way that we can contrast how people imagined the world hundred years ago with the way we imagine it now.  

The course will have two focus points: Part I will focus on late medieval and Renaissance influences on Shakespeare to understand better the premodern imagination that still played a deeply influential role in shaping his work. In the second half of the course, there will be an overview of the Enlightenment and Romantic thinking and imagination that has shaped what we have come to think of as the ‘modern’. 

The main thrust of this course is to give students an overview of the most important ideas over the last millennium as they have influenced the Western secularizing imagination of reality. This shift in the imagination from to one that is enchanted to  disenchanted, while having an enormous impact first in the societies of the North Atlantic, has had and is having, for better and worse, an equally significant  impact on cultures and societies everywhere else.

 

In addition to assigned course readings students need to spend at least 2 hours a week outside of class watching films that relate to course content

HONORS 211 B: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome (A&H, W)

HONORS 211 B: Authoritarianism and its Appeal in Ancient Rome (A&H, W)

SLN 15662 (View UW registration info »)

Michael Ritter (Classics)
Email: mritte@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

will be offered Mondays & Wednesdays 9:30-11:20. course will be unlocked once corrected.

The transition from the Republic to the Imperial period in Roman history brought stability and a reprieve from generations of civil wars, but it also signaled a loss of rights. The central question of this course will be what the Romans ultimately gave up for this authoritarian stability and why. Through primary and secondary sources as well as archaeological evidence, we will use this period as a lens to investigate the curtailing of rights such as freedom of speech and democracy. Specifically, we will investigate the following trends and the role they played in the breakdown of the Republican system: 1. Civil War

2. Inequality 

3. Cult of Personality

4. Imperialism

HONORS 211 C: Text Technologies: Reading and Writing: Manuscripts in the Middle Ages (A&H, W)

HONORS 211 C: Text Technologies: Reading and Writing: Manuscripts in the Middle Ages (A&H, W)

SLN 15663 (View UW registration info »)

Beatrice Arduini (French and Italian Studies)
Office: PDL C-249, Box 354361
Phone: (206) 616-9560
Email: barduini@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 6 students

Honors Credit Type

This course will provide a foundation for the knowledge and skills necessary to deal with manuscripts, their languages, and sources in the medieval period. We will consider the techniques, terminology, and bibliography of manuscript scholarship with a special emphasis on the production of manuscripts from Antiquity through the Renaissance, the evolution of scripts, the rise of literacy, the development of libraries, and the impact of evolving forms in the literary tradition. We will also engage in the scholarly debate regarding centers of production, scribes, type of manuscripts and texts, codicological and paleographical and linguistic features, sources and theological background. The stress on the practical application of theoretical principles will give students both a solid foundation and also ‘hands-on’ experience in the cataloguing, transcribing, and editing of original manuscripts. We will look at specific manuscripts held at the UW Special Collections in both print and digital formats, setting the manuscripts in their historical and social contexts. Taught in English.

HONORS 241 A: Russian Crime Fiction (A&H, W)

HONORS 241 A: Russian Crime Fiction (A&H, W)

SLN 15669 (View UW registration info »)

Galya Diment (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: A219 Padelford Hall, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-6848
Email: galya@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

Must register for this section for Honors credit.

Honors students required to complete a longer mid-term, and either a longer final exam or a 10-12 page paper.

Introduces important trends and movements in Russian literary and cultural history.

HONORS 241 A: Russia's Big Books (A&H)

HONORS 241 A: Russia’s Big Books (A&H)

SLN 15670 (View UW registration info »)

Jose Alaniz (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: M256 Smith Hall, Box 353580
Phone: 543-7580
Email: jos23@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 10 students

Honors Credit Type

The Russia’s Big Books courses study one big/epic novel by the titans of Russian literature per quarter. Includes such novels as Tolstoy’s War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Goncharov’s Oblomov, Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, and Nabokov’s Ada. All readings are in English. 

Honors students will complete an extended midterm and complete additional final write-ups/papers. Reflective reports will also be an optional component for Honors students.

Honors Science (4)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 221 A: DNA and Evolution (NSc, W)

HONORS 221 A: DNA and Evolution (NSc, W)

SLN 15664 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations? Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions. Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.

Students who have previously taken “DNA and Evolution” are not eligible to enroll in this course again. Additionally, students who have taken or are planning to take BIOL 354 with Professor Herron should not register for this course as there is significant overlap in material.

HONORS 221 B: Calderwood Seminar: Public Writing - Math That Lies: Communicating Why Some Quantitative Arguments Are Misleading or Bogus (NSc, W)

HONORS 221 B: Calderwood Seminar: Public Writing – Math That Lies: Communicating Why Some Quantitative Arguments Are Misleading or Bogus (NSc, W)

SLN 15665 (View UW registration info »)

Neal Koblitz (Mathematics)
Office: C-335 Padelford, Box 354350
Phone: 543-4386
Email: koblitz@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

This will be a 5-credit seminar on public writing. Students will learn how to interrogate quantitative arguments and dubious uses of numerical data — in controversies regarding public health (COVID-19), race (redlining), education (value-added modeling), investment strategies (buying land), and other aspects of society. Each student will write five short pieces (such as a book review or op-ed), which will be edited by other students and further workshopped during class. Readings will consist of two books and several shorter pieces, including “Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil and a chapter of “How to Lie with Statistics” by Darrell Huff.

The goal will be to learn to write clearly and persuasively for a general readership about quantitative aspects of socially important controversies. The course is open to mathematical science majors as well as to students in any major in the Honors Program.

HONORS 221 C: Game Theory and its Applications (NSc, W)

HONORS 221 C: Game Theory and its Applications (NSc, W)

SLN 15666 (View UW registration info »)

Jacob Cooper (Biology)
Office: LSB 5th floor, Box 351800
Email: yankel@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

In game theory, a “game” is any interaction in which decisions must be made. Penalty kicks in soccer. Nuclear disarmament. Predator-prey behaviors. Hostage negotiation. Voting coalitions. Auction bidding. Insurance pricing. Cooperative hunting. Fish schooling. Political collusion. Information sharing. And on and on and on. Game theory is a math toolkit used to analyze games. It’s a way to formalize games, to think about their strategies, their dynamics, and the expected actions of others. Game theory is the study of how we do — and do not — get along.

Topics likely covered:

  • payoffs, utility, moves, strategies
  • nash equilibria, probabilistic strategies
  • prisoners dilemma
  • signaling
  • credibility and non-credible threats
  • risk management
  • cultural conventions
  • auction theory
  • voting systems
  • power & coalitions
  • fair devision and envy
  • two-sided matching
  • decision heuristics

HONORS 221 D: Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases (NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 221 D: Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases (NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 22165 (View UW registration info »)

Audrey Ragsac (Biology)
Email: auragsac@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

Emerging infectious diseases (IDs) are infections that have recently appeared within a population or those whose incidence or geographic range is rapidly increasing or threatens to increase in the near future. Emerging infections can be caused by: Previously undetected or unknown infectious agents Known agents that have spread to new geographic locations or new populations Previously known agents whose role in specific diseases has previously gone unrecognized. Re-emergence of agents whose incidence of disease had significantly declined in the past, but whose incidence of the disease has reappeared. This class of diseases is known as re-emerging infectious diseases.

This course will focus on an overview of the basic principles of infectious diseases (IDs) focusing on emerging and re-emerging IDs that affect public health in the U.S. and worldwide.

Topics include:

*Scope and nature of the problem of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (IDs).
*Factors involved in the emergence and re-emergence of IDs.
*Basic biology and epidemiology of selected emerging and re-emerging ID agents (bacteria, viruses, prions, helminths, and eukaryotic protozoans).
*Public health, economic, and social impact of emerging and re-emerging IDs.
*Compare strains of Sars-Cov-2 and other coronaviruses (SARS & MERS) and analyze pathogenicity based on amino acid variations.
*Work in research teams and use bioinformatics to elucidate variations in nucleotides sequences (changes in parts of the genome) of viruses associated with increased pathogenicity/virulence. *Predict the pathogenicity of future mutations and/or viruses that have yet to jump species.
*Strategies for diagnosis, prevention, and control of emerging and re-emerging IDs.

Honors Social Sciences (3)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 231 A: Grand Challenges for Entrepreneurs (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 231 A: Grand Challenges for Entrepreneurs (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15667 (View UW registration info »)

Emily Pahnke (Foster School of Business)
Office: 422 Paccar Hall, Box 353226
Email: eacox@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS/ENTRE course

Students must register for the HONORS listing of the class if they wish to earn Honors credit.

How are you going to change the world? Grand Challenges for Entrepreneurs provides tools to better understand the big problems the world faces and to identify, design and implement effective solutions. In class you’ll learn about topics ranging from poverty, climate change, global health, to inequality and polarization. Using the lens of entrepreneurship you will also learn frameworks and tools including design thinking, business models and execution strategies to better understand these problems and potential solutions.

HONORS 231 B: Gender, Diplomacy, and Human Rights (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 231 B: Gender, Diplomacy, and Human Rights (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15668 (View UW registration info »)

Elise Rainer (Scandinavian Studies)
Email: eacr@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

Through this class, students will gain an understanding of how women’s rights and LGBTI diplomacy are now a part of modern foreign policy. Feminist foreign policy, gender and security, and equitable international development policies are key themes explored in the course. Students will examine the growing trend of nations declaring a formal feminist foreign policy, including Canada, France, and Mexico in diplomatic efforts to address intersectionality, human security, and challenge global power structures. This class will examine historical institutional barriers and restrictions to women and LGBTI officers in foreign affairs institutions. Looking internationally, class participants will examine examples from New Zealand and Scandinavia to learn how female leadership shapes foreign policy. Students will develop a cross-cultural comparisons, as well as critical approaches to the gendered aspect of policy-making. As a former diplomat who formulated human rights policies and programs, the instructor brings real-world experience of diplomacy and gender to the classroom. Furthermore, the course will host guest speakers who are current and former diplomats, leading human rights LGBTI advocates, as well as scholars with expertise on gender and diplomacy. The course scrutinizes gender roles in relation to power, agency, and influence to shape new norms in international affairs. With a goal to give students both hope and agency, students will learn how individuals and advocacy networks can influence policy reform.

HONORS 231 C: "Western Civilization" and Global Public Policy (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 231 C: "Western Civilization" and Global Public Policy (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 22096 (View UW registration info »)

LaShawnDa Pittman (American Ethnic Studies)
Office: B517 Padelford
Email: lpittman@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

In this course, we will explore definitions, ideologies, values, processes, and geopolitics associated with “Western Civilization.” We will look at how feminism, Afrocentrism, and other critical frameworks have challenged assumptions about “Western Civilization.” We consider the impact of “Western Civilization” on the United States and other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. The OECD is an international organization that works with governments, policy makers, and citizens to establish evidence-based international standards and find solutions to a range of social, economic, and environmental challenges. In this course, we will investigate the ways in which the OECD and its 38 member countries represent diverse experiences of “Western Civilization.” As I center the relationship between “Western Civilization” and the United States, students will choose an OECD country to investigate similarly. Course assignments will assess students’ independent and group work around this and other tasks. We will also examine how the United States compares to other OECD countries; specifically, regarding (1) social and welfare issues (social policy that protects individuals and their families), (2) education; (3) employment; (4) economy; (5) health; and (6) green growth and sustainable development. The OECD has a database that provides up-to-date statistics for making comparisons between countries and identifying trends over time. Finally, we will investigate gaps by race and ethnicity (including migrants), gender, and age across wellbeing outcomes, as well as the laws and public policies aimed to improve people’s well-being and reduce inequalities.

Honors Interdisciplinary (4)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Honors Electives requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Inquiry designation.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: How to Read E-Literature (C)

HONORS 345 A: How to Read E-Literature (C)

SLN 15671 (View UW registration info »)

Ileana Marin (Comparative History of Ideas; Comparative Literature)
Phone: 206 604-1831
Email: marini@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

“How read electronic literature” is a hands-on experiential, interdisciplinary course that guides students to profit from their exploration of digital media. We will acquaint ourselves with a selection of the most creative electronic works of the twenty-first century as we cross disciplinary boundaries, engaging recent literary history, technology, aesthetics, visual arts, sound design, and multimedia. With the rapid development of electronic and digital tools, e-literature competes with digital games for players’ interest. Engaging with the multimedia jargon of digital literature (remediation, digital poetics, cyberspace textuality, active creation of belief, and medial ideology) we will go through the non-trivial process of reading famous digital works by Deena Larsen, Andrew Campana, Alan Sondheim, John Zuern, Zuzana Husarova, Shelley Jackson, and Mark Bernstein. Our journey through digital works will open the path to self-discovery as we will immerse ourselves into various forms of “reading”.

HONORS 391 A: Race, Gender, Diaspora & Population Health (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 391 A: Race, Gender, Diaspora & Population Health (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15672 (View UW registration info »)

Clarence Spigner (Health Services)
Office: H-692 Health Sciences Building, Box 357660
Phone: 206 616-2948
Email: cspigner@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This 300-level 5-credit course explores the health of populations across the planet. Multiculturalism and the Problem Based Learning (PBL) allow students to investigate inequalities in health. More than 35 open-ended topics or cases include sex-worker rights, white saviors, Ebola, anti-immigration policies, #MeToo, incarceration, female circumcision, racial admixture, and LGBTQ issues. Randomly selected cohorts of 3-4 students investigate and present on a randomly selected cases/topics. Also, a 5-7-page, typewritten double-spaced essay of a critically read book, or short story from a reading list more than 40 titles (I&S, VLPA, NW, Diversity, W).

HONORS 391 B: Visions of the Land: Cultural Landscapes of Seattle and the Salish Sea Region (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 391 B: Visions of the Land: Cultural Landscapes of Seattle and the Salish Sea Region (A&H / SSc / NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15673 (View UW registration info »)

Timothy Billo (Program on the Environment)
Phone: 206-407-4056
Email: timbillo@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This is an interdisciplinary environmental history course which examines the intersection of the physical landscape and natural resources of the Salish Sea region, with the various people and cultures that have existed on the landscape through time. Working with a variety of texts, both non-fiction and fiction, paintings, historical documents, and guest lectures, we will pay special attention to the history and experience of marginalized cultures, and the relationship of these cultures with the land and its resources through time. Much of the course will necessarily focus on Native American cultures, past and present, but we will also explore, for example, the African American experience in Seattle, and effects of ongoing gentrification in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Literature on the development of western European environmental philosophy, will also provide crucial context to our discussions. Through an individual writing project and a collaborative media project, we will seek to give voice to forgotten and marginalized peoples, and associated spaces, on the greater Seattle landscape.

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 15674 (View UW registration info »)

Catherine Connors (Classics)
Office: Denny 262 B, Box 353110
Phone: 206- 543-2266
Email: cconnors@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

In this course we shall read and discuss ancient Greek and Roman sources on religion, philosophy, medicine and law along with modern scholarly analyses of ancient society to explore the roles of women in ancient Greek and Roman society. Our goals are: to acquire a strong familiarity through analysis of primary sources with the features of social and civic life in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to gain a critical awareness of scholarly analysis of the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world; to reflect on the beliefs, policies and actions that shaped and constrained the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world and how these issues can be understood in relation to intersectional issues of gender, class and status in modern contexts.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15675 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum (SSc)

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum (SSc)

SLN 15676 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

Honors Electives (11)

Any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Honors Electives requirement. You will earn Areas of Inquiry credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 451 A: Honors Biochem (NSc)

BIOC 451 A: Honors Biochem (NSc)

SLN 11358 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

Minimum of a 3.0 in BIOC 450 or 3.5 in BIOC 440
Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu to enroll
Add Code required

BIOC 451 is the honors version of BIOC 441; it covers the same topics in metabolism and gene expression using the same textbook, but is taught as a group discussion of selected publications from the primary literature, with an emphasis on research strategy, experimental design, creative thinking, and scientific communication.

CHEM 155: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 155: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12257 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 72 students

Honors Credit Type

Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for registration questions

Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

$75 course fee – auditors exempt
Fee purpose: Lab
LAB SECTIONS CANNOT BE OVERLOADED.
NO WAITLISTS. VISIT NOTIFY.UW.EDU.

Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 346: Organic Chemistry Honors Laboratory (NSc)

CHEM 346: Organic Chemistry Honors Laboratory (NSc)

SLN 12396 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 3
Limit: 24 students

Credit Type

Contact Chemistry for add codes.
Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.
Students who do not complete the prerequisites will be dropped from this course.
$75 course fee – auditors exempt
Fee purpose: Lab
LAB SECTIONS CANNOT BE OVERLOADED.
NO WAITLISTS. VISIT NOTIFY.UW.EDU.
—————————
OFFERED VIA REMOTE LEARNING

To accompany CHEM 336. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 241, CHEM 346 (3 credits).

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

SLN 13158 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 122 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 122 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 HA section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 122 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

Computer programming for students with some previous programming experience. Emphasizes program design, style, and decomposition. Uses data structures (e.g., lists, dictionaries, sets) to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Introduces data abstraction and interface versus implementation. Recommended: CSE 121 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

SLN 13159 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 123 lecture
2. corresponding CSE 123 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. CSE 390 HB

Computer programming for students with significant previous programming experience. Emphasizes implementation and run-time analysis of data structures and algorithms using techniques including linked references, recursion, and object-oriented inheritance to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Recommended: CSE 122 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

ENGL 182 H: Composition: Multimodal (C)

ENGL 182 H: Composition: Multimodal (C)

SLN 14436 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Counts for Honors Electives and UW Composition Requirement. Student must be registered for Honors specific section.

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Priority I Registration for Freshmen and Sophomores only. Email uwhonors@uw.edu for add code

English 182 focuses on teaching strategies and skills for effective writing and argument that are required of traditional academic genres, such as the research essay, while also expanding the skills for composing in multimodal genres that our increasingly digital and media saturated world demands.

Section H is an Honors discussion driven class with minimal lecturing and grounded in a disability studies analytic.  Students will reflect on their own growth as scholars and their learning process as an evolving product. Honors students will write longer reflective papers with emphasis on metacognitive critical takeaways.

English 182K (Honors) syllabus

ENGL 282 A: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

ENGL 282 A: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

SLN 14479 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code required. Email uwhonors@uw.edu to request code

Intermediate Multimodal Composition:Strategies for composing effective multimodal texts for print, digital physical delivery, with focus on affordances of various modes–words, images, sound, design, and gesture–and genres to address specific rhetorical situations both within and beyond the academy. Although the course has no prerequisites, instructors assume knowledge of academic writing.

L ARCH 353 B: History of Modern Landscape Architecture (A&H / SSc, W)

L ARCH 353 B: History of Modern Landscape Architecture (A&H / SSc, W)

SLN 16439 (View UW registration info »)

Elizabeth Umbanhowar (Landscape Architecture)
Email: umbanhow@uw.edu

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Development of profession and art of landscape architecture in the United States, Europe, South America, and Japan in relation to prevailing social, economic, political, and cultural factors. Relationships with other professions, especially architecture and urban planning, and other arts, such as painting and sculpture.

MATH 135: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

MATH 135: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

SLN 17360 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department.
Students must have completed or be in Honors MATH 134.

Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 335: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

MATH 335: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

SLN 17443 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 334.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 334. Offered: W.

PHYS 142: Honors Electromagnetism (NSc)

PHYS 142: Honors Electromagnetism (NSc)

SLN 19516 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 44 students

Honors Credit Type

If you have completed either PHYS 121 or PHYS 122 or have transfer credit (including AP credit) for those courses, and you think you are prepared and would like the challenge to take the next course in the sequence in the honors sequence, you should contact the instructor. Based on a discussion with the instructor of your preparedness, the instructor will help you determine what is required to ensure that you succeed in the honors sequence and will determine if the prerequisite should be waived.

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION AND ASSOCIATED QUIZ SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

See Physics department for more information and review their Honors Physics 142 and the Honors Physics overview pages:
https://phys.washington.edu/courses/2021/winter/phys/142a
https://phys.washington.edu/141-142-143-courses

Addresses same material as PHYS 122 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 115, PHYS 118, PHYS 122, and PHYS 142. Prerequisite: a minimum grade of 2.5 in PHYS 141; and MATH 125 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; recommended: high-school-level physics course. Offered: W.

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