University of Washington Honors Program

Course for Spring 2021

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

H-Arts & Humanities (5)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 212 A: American Sabor: Latinos and Latinas in US Popular Music

HONORS 212 A: American Sabor: Latinos and Latinas in US Popular Music (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 15106 (View UW registration info »)

Marisol Berrios-Miranda (Music)
Email: marisolbmd1@yahoo.com

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

Latino contributions to popular music in the United States have too often been relegated to the margins of a narrative dominated by African and European Americans-an overly black and white view of our musical history. Latin music is often portrayed as an exotic resource for “American” musicians, as suggested by pianist Jelly Roll Morton’s reference to “the Latin Tinge.” This course turns that phrase and that perspective on its head. “American Sabor” addresses problems of cultural representation that concern an increasingly visible and influential community in the U.S. We will document the roles of U.S. Latino musicians as interpreters of Latin American genres. We will also highlight their roles as innovators within genres normally considered indigenous to the U.S., such as rock and roll, R & B, jazz, country/western, and hip-hop. The course distinguishes regional centers of Latino population and music production-exploring unique histories, artists, and musical styles. At the same time, it draws out broader patterns of boundary crossing, language, social struggle, generational difference, racial/ethnic/class/gender identification, and other factors that shape the experiences of U.S. Latinos everywhere.

HONORS 212 B: Ways of Meaning

HONORS 212 B: Ways of Meaning (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 15107 (View UW registration info »)

Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: Padelford A217, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-7691
Email: dziwirek@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

There will be 55 students total in this course (25 Honors/30 Slavic)

The key questions this course addresses are How do people talk to each other in different languages? Does the language we speak determine who we are? What is the relationship between language and thought, culture, national identity? We consider crosslinguistic differences and similarities with respect to conceptualizations of Moral Concepts, Friendship and Love, Freedom, Homeland, Politeness and Rudeness and Gender. Students are required to write 2 commentaries and a final term paper. Honors students are expected to write a longer, more in-depth final paper and do one additional commentary in which they reflect on universal vs. culture-specific aspects of language and how their understanding has changed during the course.

HONORS 212 C: Stories of Knowledge/Knowledge of Stories

HONORS 212 C: Stories of Knowledge/Knowledge of Stories (VLPA, DIV, W)

SLN 15108 (View UW registration info »)

Jeanette Bushnell (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies)
Office: Padelford B110, Box 354345
Phone: 206 543-6900
Email: pembina@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

Story, Knowledge, and Systems of Power in which they move are the central concepts of this course. Stories and storytelling used as both pedagogy and source information. Story is understood to be any narration on any topic about any event with any amount of veracity and/or claim to exclusiveness of accuracy – from indigenous storytellers orating in a bighouse to science texts of the westernized academy to online D&D gaming to political rhetoric. Philosophies, performances, and politics of power will be large components of our time together.

We will explore knowledges, philosophies and histories as told by indigenous people around the globe. We will spend time with contemporary versions of history in which various stories of reality have been forwarded or erased. We will hear from guest tellers of stories and we will write and perform stories, being ever aware of where all these sharings reside within scholarly canons. We will ponder and converse with these ideas: 

  • performances of living
  • methodologies for scholarship
  • knowledge systems and their genealogies including creation stories
  • negotiating and negotiated histories and philosophies
  • identities – particularly as they relate to power systems of telling stories

HONORS 212 D: Russia's Big Books: Nabokov

HONORS 212 D: Russia’s Big Books: Nabokov (VLPA, W)

SLN 21280 (View UW registration info »)

Galya Diment (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: A219 Padelford Hall, Box 354335
Phone: 206-543-6848
Email: galya@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

Examines the works of Vladimir Nabokov, from his early novels written in Europe to his later masterpieces, including Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, and Ada.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

ENGL 182 G: Composition: Multimodal

ENGL 182 G: Composition: Multimodal (C)

SLN 14012 (View UW registration info »)

Caitlin Postal (English)
Email: cpostal@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Counts for Honors "Additional Any" and UW Composition Requirement

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Priority I Registration for Freshmen & Sophomore.

Entry codes are required for this course. To request a code please contact uwhonors@uw.edu.

Study and practice of strategies/skills for effective writing/argument in various situations, disciplines, genres; explicit focus on how multimodal elements of writing–words, images, sound, design, etc.– work together to produce meaning. 

H-Science (12)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 222 A: Pain

HONORS 222 A: Pain (NW, W)

SLN 15109 (View UW registration info »)

Jonathan Mayer (Epidemiology; Geography)
Phone: 206-543-7110
Email: jmayer@uw.edu
John Loeser (Neurological Surgery; Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine)
Phone: 206 543-3570
Email: jdloeser@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

This seminar course will utilize a flipped classroom model to investigate all aspects of pain; from the anatomy and physiology and psychology that create this common complaint, to the sociology, history, ethics, legal and medical issues that are associated with pain. This course does not presuppose any educational background and is open to students in any major.

HONORS 222 B: Evolution and Human Behavior

HONORS 222 B: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW, W)

SLN 15110 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these: Why are women and men different? Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy? Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children? When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why? What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior. 
  • Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.  *Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals. 
  • Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 222 C: Evolution and Human Behavior

HONORS 222 C: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW, W)

SLN 15111 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these: Why are women and men different? Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy? Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children? When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why? What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior. 
  • Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.  *Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals. 
  • Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 222 D: The Robots are Coming! Or are They? A Deep Dive into Advances in Artificial Intelligence

HONORS 222 D: The Robots are Coming! Or are They? A Deep Dive into Advances in Artificial Intelligence (NW, W)

SLN 15112 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Freeman (Physics)
Email: rrfree@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

Explore the recent history of the dramatic advances in artificial intelligence science and robot technology and their impacts on our culture and lives. Research the extent that robots and computers have freed whole swaths of jobs and occupations from the necessity of human involvement. Attempt to understand the current reach of “machine thought” or A.I., and try to make realistic predictions of where this science/technology is likely to lead. Finally, we will confront the question of whether we are witnessing the beginning of the end of the central role of humans in the future of civilization: That is, while we will (hopefully) be around to experience the future, we may not necessarily be in control.

The course will involve wide ranging readings on the impact of automation/robots in our economy, and the effects, good and bad, on our economy. We will explore the question of whether machine thought will advance to the critical point of machines being able to design and build the next generation of “machine thinkers”. Most importantly, we need to address the question of whether there is anything about being a human that ultimately a (very advanced) machine cannot do much better.

The goal to explore the vast resources of the internet, and the ideas presented in our entertainment media and contrast and compare these results with academic research on the same subjects. Is the hype real, or is it simply a product of our culture’s current obsession with what is trending?

This is a course for students who have always been fascinated with the rapid advance in technology, and find themselves wondering if the ever increasing pace of technological advancement is necessarily always a good thing.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 442 A: Honors Biochemistry

BIOC 442 A: Honors Biochemistry (NW)

SLN 11224 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 16 students

Honors Credit Type

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 GPA in either BIOC 440 or 450

Register for lecture and Honors section (AC)
CONTACT ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU TO ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 165: Honors General Chemistry

CHEM 165: Honors General Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12049 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 48 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.2 in CHEM 155

Introduction to systematic inorganic chemistry: representative elements, metals, and nonmetals. Includes coordination complexes, geochemistry, and metallurgy. Additional material on environmental applications of basic chemistry presented. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 162, CHEM 165 (5 credits); CHEM 165, CHEM 312 (5 credits).

CHEM 337: Honors Organic Chemistry

CHEM 337: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12160 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 50 students

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.2 in CHEM 336.

Chemistry majors and other students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Biomolecules. Introduction to membranes, enzyme mechanisms, prosthetic groups, macromolecular conformations, and supramolecular architecture. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following courses: CHEM 239, CHEM 337.

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I

CSE 142 / CSE 390 HA: Computer Programming I (NW)

SLN ?

Credits: 4 + 1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 Honors section (HA)

See CSE Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390 H.

Contact CSE advising (ugrad-advisor@cs.washington.edu) for add code

CSE 142 will cover basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects. The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

CSE 143 / CSE 390: Computer Programming II

CSE 143 / CSE 390: Computer Programming II (NW)

SLN ?

Credits: 5 + 1
Limit: 20 students

Honors Credit Type

To earn Honors credit, students must register for and complete ALL of the following:

Register for CSE 143 lecture A or B AND a corresponding CSE 143 section
Register for CSE 390 H lecture AND corresponding CSE 390 HB section

(See Time Schedule/MyPlan for course day, time and SLN for both CSE 143 and CSE 390)

CSE 143 is a continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. 

The Honors CSE 390 course will be a special topics discussion section decided on by the instructor. 

MATH 136 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus

MATH 136 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)

SLN 16668 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math Department only. Contact: advising@math.washington.edu

Students must have completed Honors MATH 135.

Sequence covers the material of 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. Third quarter of the first year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May not receive credit for both 126 and 136. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 336: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus

MATH 336: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NW)

SLN 16730 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 45 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code available from Math department.

Prereq: Minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 335

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Third quarter of the second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 143 B: Honors Waves, Light and Heat

PHYS 143 B: Honors Waves, Light and Heat (NW)

SLN 18786 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 44 students

Honors Credit Type

If you have completed either PHYS 121 or PHYS 122 or have transfer credit (including AP credit) for those courses, and you think you are prepared and would like the challenge to take the next course in the sequence in the honors sequence, you should contact the instructor. Based on a discussion with the instructor of your preparedness, the instructor will help you determine what is required to ensure that you succeed in the honors sequence and will determine if the prerequisite should be waived.

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION AND ASSOCIATED QUIZ SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

See Physics department for more information and review their Honors Physics 142 and the Honors Physics overview pages:
https://phys.washington.edu/courses/2021/winter/phys/142a
https://phys.washington.edu/141-142-143-courses

Addresses same material as PHYS 123 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 116, PHYS 119, PHYS 123, and PHYS 143. 

 

H-Social Sciences (4)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 232 A: Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility

HONORS 232 A: Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15113 (View UW registration info »)

Velma Veloria (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: velorv@uw.edu
Sutapa Basu (Executive Director, Alene Moris Women’s Center, Affiliate Assistant Professor, GWSS)
Email: sbasu@uw.edu
Connie So (American Ethnic Studies)
Email: ccso@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

The Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization: Forced Labor, Involuntary Servitude and Corporate & Civic Responsibility examines the root causes of the human trafficking industry and analysizes possible strategies to prevent and minimize the trade. Course highlights includes essays, speakers and films on Forced Migration & Labor Rights, International Trade Agreements, Human Rights, Public Health, How to Improve Survivor Services, Ethical Sourcing & Sustainable Development, and Humanizing the Impacts of Human Trafficking.

HONORS 232 B: The Ecology of Urban Seattle

HONORS 232 B: The Ecology of Urban Seattle (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15114 (View UW registration info »)

Richard Conlin (Urban Design and Planning)
Email: richardbyrdconlin@gmail.com

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

The Ecology of Urban Seattle examines social, design, political, and environmental factors that promote healthy urban neighborhoods and the integration of urban communities and ecological realities. We will use these interactions to gain a deeper awareness of how these systems function in relationship to each other, to social and economic diversity, and to growth management and climate change. We will use a Race and Social Justice (RSJ) screen as a key element in evaluating how communities are shaped.

Cities function as a place where human communities come together to work, live, and interact. They also exist in a specific social, political, and ecological context, including the relationship between development and the environment, the interaction of human habitation and natural systems, and the relationship of human activities to the health of diverse cultures and the long-term viability of the local and global climate.

This class tells the story of the emerging urban paradigm built around resilience and sustainability, along with the social context through which that has evolved and can evolve in the future. Participants will study four communities, reviewing their history and ecological context, and examining the evolution of neighborhood development. The instructor will lead the class through an RSJ review of each community, beginning with an introduction to the technique and presentation on the initial neighborhood, and leading to a student paper on the fourth neighborhood in which each student will apply the RSJ screen.

HONORS 232 C: Truth and Power In the History of Education

HONORS 232 C: Truth and Power In the History of Education (I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15115 (View UW registration info »)

Nancy Beadie (Education)
Office: 303D Miller
Phone: Phone +1 206-2
Email: nbeadie@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

A central aim of education in the United States since at least the revolution has been to equip citizens to effectively bear witness to truth in the face of corruption and abuses of power. And yet, as we know, truth itself is multiple and highly contested. Nor does it speak for itself. It depends, instead, on the voices and actions of those who have been educated to it. For these reasons, education has also been a central site of social and political conflict.

In this course we examine multiple historical attempts to negotiate tensions between the reality of falsehood and the plurality of truth in the history of education. We begin by posing two overarching questions about the role of education in history and of history in education. We then proceed to analyze examples of how particular historical actors have understood the implications of such questions in their own lives and times, from the early national period to the late 20th century. To conclude, students use the history we’ve examined to engage the question of how historical knowledge can and should inform education for civic agency in our own time.

HONORS 232 D: History of the Social Sciences

HONORS 232 D: History of the Social Sciences (I&S, W)

SLN 15116 (View UW registration info »)

Daniel Bessner (Jackson School of International Studies)
Phone: (206) 685-1043
Email: dbessner@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course explores the history of the social sciences from their advent in the nineteenth century until today, with a focus on the twentieth century. Social sciences examined include economics, psychology, history, sociology, anthropology, and others.

H-Interdisciplinary (6)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Additional Any requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Reading and Writing the City

HONORS 345 A: Reading and Writing the City (C)

SLN 15117 (View UW registration info »)

Naomi Sokoloff (Near Eastern Languages & Civilization)
Office: Denny 220C, Box 353120
Phone: 206-543-7145
Email: naosok@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

What’s it like to live in Seattle? Can you put it into words?

This course considers a range of writers who have taken on that challenge and, in a variety of ways, in different eras, have depicted life in Seattle. Reading assignments for this class include fiction, poetry, vignettes, essays, and popular song lyrics that explore the city, its history, its geography, and its diverse population.

How has the literary imagination perceived and portrayed Seattle? One of the goals of this course is to ask how literary representations have shaped, conformed to, diverged from, and /or contested prevailing images of Seattle. In popular culture and commercial contexts Seattle has often been associated with economic cycles of boom and bust; it has been cast as a town beset by provincialism, booster, and hucksters; as a singular locale that has evolved from pioneering outpost to radical hotbed to hi-tech hub. Often defined as a gateway to the great outdoors, Seattle has also been called a livable city and a city of neighborhoods. It has come to be known, too, as a hip city, celebrated for its coffee culture, grunge music, and cutting edge arts scene. The texts selected for this course illuminate, complicate, and enrich such understandings of the city. As Peter Donahue remarks in Reading Seattle: The City in Prose, literature may serve to “amplify, augment and add to” readers’ own experiences of Seattle, making the city more legible to them and guiding them to interpret it with new insight.

In the past two decades, even as literature of Seattle has proliferated, Seattle has emerged as one of America’s most literate cities. Literary festivals, readings, bookstores, and special events abound. This course encourages students to discover and experience some of that cultural vitality. Students will have opportunities to work with community organizations that promote writing in and about Seattle, so as to learn about contemporary literary voices and about museums, historical societies, and other agencies engaged with recounting stories of Seattle’s past. Students may choose to volunteer 2-3 hours a week, to reflect on their experiences in connection with issues raised in classroom discussion and reading assignments, and to include written reports of their activities in their Honors portfolios. Students who prefer may write a 7-8 page research paper in lieu of service learning.

This is a C (Composition) course, which means that student will compose several drafts of their essay assignments and they will receive peer review along with feedback from the instructor. Editing and revision are an integral part of the process of writing; students will rework their essays in order to refine their prose, articulate their views, and practice proofreading, citation and documentation of sources.

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar on Public Writing Urban Justice and Sustainability in Seattle

HONORS 345 B: Calderwood Seminar on Public Writing Urban Justice and Sustainability in Seattle (C, DIV)

SLN 15118 (View UW registration info »)

Candice Rai (English)
Email: crai@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 12 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

Priority to juniors and seniors, by year. Other students by permission of instructor (contact: crai@uw.edu). 

This is a public writing course that engages the City of Seattle’s Race & Social Justice and Equity & Environment Initiatives and explores various interrelated and intersectional dynamics that underscore and perpetuate urban inequities within issues associated with those initiatives, such as housing affordability, environmental and racial justice, education, food security, and transportation. This public writing course conceives writing as a form of public action and draws on rhetoric’s longstanding civic role of preparing individuals and communities to respond nimbly, creatively, and ethically to our most urgent public problems. Rhetoric—which is foundational to all communication—is an interdisciplinary public art that facilitates cross-cultural capacities for collective problem solving and action.

Students will use mixed method approaches to research and write about local urban issues and social movements for justice. Students will work together to better understand and make public interventions within these issues and will be supported through intensive writing workshops designed to foster critical capacities for engaging and communicating with public audiences. This class fulfills UW’s “C” composition or “W” writing requirement, if composition has been completed. 

 

 

HONORS 391A: Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism

HONORS 391A: Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism (VLPA / I&S / NW, W)

SLN 15119 (View UW registration info »)

Robert Pavia (School of Marine and Environmental Affairs)
Office: 3707 Brooklyn Avenue NE, Box 359485
Phone: 206 502-5243
Email: bobpavia@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

Powerful forces are aligned against implementing changes necessary to mitigate climate impacts. By introducing doubt about science and motives, divisiveness undermines the public’s understanding and belief in climate science and the actions necessary to mitigate its effects.

This course explores the science of climate change in the context of social and political constraints. It further explores the role of art and activism in communicating climate impacts and mitigation options. Students will gain knowledge of key atmospheric and ocean science principles along with the role of science and uncertainty in social change and apply them to evolving climate issues in the context of Arctic nations and peoples.

Arctic indigenous peoples are working with Arctic states to engage in the climate change discussion. The course considers the impacts of climate change to Arctic nations and people, and also how they are contributing through literature, music, art and science.

Climate impacts have social justice ramifications as does the study of climate science. The course uses climate science to explore how scientists, artists and musicians connect climate science to emotional engagement and activism. In studying climate change, students will develop skills for critically evaluating the popular portrayal of scientific concepts and their role in policy debates as a way to gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity of developing sustainable and just societies. 

HONORS 392 A: Educational Psychology and the College Experience

HONORS 392 A: Educational Psychology and the College Experience (I&S / NW, W)

SLN 21566 (View UW registration info »)

Jacob Cooper (Biology)
Office: LSB 5th floor, Box 351800
Email: yankel@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

There’s an entire field in which researchers scientifically test elements of the college experience. Is group studying or solo studying more effective? How does anxiety affect test-taking, and what can you do about it? What motivates certain students to cheat? How common is cheating, anyway?  Who listens to whom in group projects, and how does that affect motivation?  What biases do people with different identities experience as they progress through college (and life)?  Are our identities rooted in biology or “just” culture, anyway?  These questions — and many more — have been experimentally tested. Some are tested with surveys, some with experiments in laboratory “classrooms”, some with experiments in actual classrooms, and some with publicly-available data. There’s a lot to explore. In this class, we will explore two main topics in this field: (1) how we can become better learners and earn higher scores, and (2) what biases may affect each of us as we progress through college.

HONORS 393 A: Music, Birdsong, and the Limits of the Human

HONORS 393 A: Music, Birdsong, and the Limits of the Human (VLPA / NW, W)

SLN 15120 (View UW registration info »)

Mark Rodgers (School of Music)
Office: MUS 225
Email: markrodg@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

Humans make music. The music we make assumes many forms, but species-wide we share certain basic musical capacities and these, in turn, are part of what make us human. Seen in evolutionary perspective, we also share some of these capacities with other species, including now-extinct hominids and scores of living mammals. But among the examples of musicality in the animal kingdom, none has occupied so potent a place in human imaginations as birdsong. Drawing together scholarly writings in musicology, ethnomusicology, anthropology, ornithology, and evolutionary studies, this course will explore some of the ways birdsong has served as the animal foil for human-making: as an object of aesthetic interest and academic study, as a source of metaphors for conceptualizing the world around us, and as a matrix for defining human and species-level differences. Assignments will include four written responses throughout the quarter, as well as midterm and final projects that may take a variety of forms, including papers, podcasts, documentary films, or creative work, depending on their interests and expertise. Students will also practice documenting their sonic environments by keeping regular “field notes” about their experiences of birdsong throughout the course.

HONORS 394 A: Feminism in the Borderlands

HONORS 394 A: Feminism in the Borderlands (VLPA / I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15122 (View UW registration info »)

Michelle Habell-Pallán (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies)
Office: PDL B110 T, Box 354380
Phone: (206) 543-6981
Email: mhabellp@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

This undergraduate seminar examines the particular forms in which Chicana feminist theoretical practices are embodied, including theoretical texts, poetry, music, and other creative works. Seminar considers how Chicana feminist theory has transformed and been transformed by intellectual, poetic, and aesthetic traditions as it moves throughout the U.S. borderlands. Each seminar meeting consists of a brief lecture, discussion break-out groups, a mid-way break, and a viewing/listening to relevant film, media or audio texts, or assignment workshop.

Course linked to annual Women Who Rock (un)conference. 

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15126 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum (I&S)

SLN 15127 (View UW registration info »)

Juliana Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors. Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

Special Topics (3)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 397 A: Solving Problems in Museum Spaces

HONORS 397 A: Solving Problems in Museum Spaces (VLPA / I&S, DIV, W)

SLN 15123 (View UW registration info »)

Angie Ong (Museology; Information School)
Office: Alumni House (AHO), Room 308, Box 354861
Phone: 206-221-0763
Email: aong@uw.edu

Credits: 2
Limit: 12 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

COMBINED 5 CREDIT COURSE
This is the second part of a two part course series. Students must have enrolled and complete the corresponding 3-credit, Winter 2021 seminar to earn 5 credits of Honors Social Science.

As museums strive to establish relevant roles in their communities, they seek out innovative ways to connect to and serve a diverse and ever-changing population. At their core, museums provide boundless opportunities for learning and engagement and are robust environments that enable students to explore issues such as cultural relevance, social justice, equity and access, health and wellbeing, community engagement, and technology impact.

In this course, UW Honors students will work with Museology graduate students in conducting research studies or developing projects that address these important museum issues. This small-team collaboration will involve ideation, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of a master’s thesis research study or project. The course aims to establish a positive, productive, and mutually beneficial connection between undergraduate and graduate student cohorts and demonstrate the strength of interdisciplinary experiences, shared expertise, and collaborative learning.

Enrollment requires a two-quarter commitment (Winter and Spring 2021) as students will work to complete a final thesis product. No prerequisite required. We value the diversity of experiences and expertise of students interested in the cultural/nonprofit sector.

WATCH MY VIDEO for more about this course.
Learn more about the Museology Graduate Program at: https://www.washington.edu/museology/

HONORS 397 C: Honors 100 Peer Educator Seminar

HONORS 397 C: Honors 100 Peer Educator Seminar (I&S)

SLN 15125 (View UW registration info »)

Claire Grant (Honors Program; Advisor)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Email: claireag@uw.edu
Nadra Fredj (Honors Program; Advisor)
Phone: 206-221-0774
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 2
Limit: 25 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

For 2021 Peer Educators Only.

Honors 100 Peer Educator Spring prep seminar.

HONORS 397 D: Working towards Justice: A mindful and compassionate approach

HONORS 397 D: Working towards Justice: A mindful and compassionate approach (I&S)

SLN 21360 (View UW registration info »)

Manka Varghese (College of Education)
Email: mankav@uw.edu
Serena Maurer
Email: serena.maurer@outlook.com

Credits: 3
Limit: 5 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

What is mindfulness?  How does it relate to work towards justice?  How does compassion fit in? In this course, we will engage mindfulness and compassion as frameworks and a set of tools towards equity and justice for all.  The course aims to : (1) cultivate awareness about inequities and their effects, (2) increase  knowledge of mindfulness, compassion and equity frameworks and the possibilities their intersections produce, (3) foster compassion for our own and one  another’s experiences of inequity and (4) provide tools and increased capacity for engaging in mindful, compassionate dialogue about historical and contemporary inequities and movement towards change.  We come at this work from an intersectional perspective, with a focus on race as it interacts with other types of difference and inequality.  The course would also offer students  tools for expanding equity work in their own diverse institutional environments and communities. Jointly listed with EDUC 200 C.