Current Courses

Course for Winter 2019

Differences between 2010-14 and 2015 Honors core requirements

Each course below lists the Interdisciplinary Honors category it will fulfill if you are on the "2010-14" or "2015" core curriculum. If you have any questions about what category a course will fulfill, please check your degree audit on MyPlan and/or contact us at uwhonors@uw.edu.

Except where noted, current Interdisciplinary Honors students may self-register using the SLN/MyPlan. Please let us know if you have any difficulties at uwhonors@uw.edu.

H-Arts & Humanities (8)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the "HONORS" prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 211 A: Okinawa in the Japanese Literary Imagination (VLPA)

SLN 15339 (View UW registration info »)

Davinder Bhowmik (Asian Languages and Literature)
Phone: 206-543-4699
Email: dbhowmik@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

This course introduces students to modern prose fiction, poetry, drama, and film that depict Okinawa, Japan's tropical playground on one hand, and its military colony on the other. While the focus of the class will be on representations of Okinawa in literature and the occasional film we will also pay close attention to the socio-historical context of the works in order to more fully understand them.

In addition to introducing students to the variety of literature and film from and about Okinawa, the course will train students to read carefully and critically; to develop the ability to construct sound readings of literary works, and to argue these readings persuasively in English. All course material will be considered historically as well as analytically.

No knowledge of Japanese is required; all works are in English translation and films are subtitled.

HONORS 211 B: Karma and Free Will in Indian Philosophy (VLPA)

SLN 15340 (View UW registration info »)

Prem Pahlajrai (Asian Languages and Literature)
Office: Gowen 231, Box 353521
Phone: 206-543-4096
Email: prem@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT
What is karma? Is our fate predestined? Or do we have free will? This course explores the tensions between the ideas of karma, agency, free will, fate and predestination in the major Indian philosophical systems.

HONORS 211 C: Ways of Meaning (VLPA)

SLN 15343 (View UW registration info »)

Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: M260 Smith, Box 353580
Phone: 206-543-7691
Email: dziwirek@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Language examines key moral and societal concepts in several languages (freedom, home, friendship, homeland). We also consider pragmatic aspects of different languages (politeness, rudeness, forms of address, names) and look for cultural differences and similarities.

HONORS 211 D: Analyzing Invented Languages: from Elvish to Dothraki (VLPA)

SLN 15344 (View UW registration info »)

Colette Moore (English)
Phone: 206-543-2182
Email: cvmoore@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

The creative force of language is nowhere so apparent as in the fictional languages that we invent. The earliest constructed language (or conlang) that we have records of is by a twelfth century nun, and people have been crafting languages ever since: to create community, to solve social problems, and to tell a good story. This course will give you an introduction to the tools for approaching invented languages analytically: the study of sound systems in language (phonology), and the study of the way that words and sentences are put together (morphosyntax). We will then examine invented languages as a historical and cultural phenomenon.

We will read Arika Okrent's In the Land of Invented Languages, with its account of auxiliary languages like Esperanto, and we will consider speculative fictional depictions of conlangs by J.R.R. Tolkien, Jorge Luis Borges, Anthony Burgess, Ted Chiang, Suzette Haden Elgin, Richard Adams, and Cathy Park Hong, as well as the screen depictions of Klingon, Na'vi, and Dothraki. We will also look at the role of the internet in the recent explosion of interest in and circulation of invented language; this is, according the Guardian newspaper, a "golden age of fictional languages."

This course satisfies the university "W" requirement for intensive writing. No background in linguistics or literature is necessary, only enthusiasm.

HONORS 241 A: Big Books: War & Peace (VLPA)

SLN 15351 (View UW registration info »)

Galya Diment (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: M-264 Smith, Box 353580
Phone: (206) 543-7344
Email: galya@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

Honors students will complete an extended midterm and complete additional final write-ups/papers. Reflective reports will also be an optional component for Honors students.

HONORS 241 C: Russian Crime Fiction (VLPA)

SLN 15353 (View UW registration info »)

Jose Alaniz (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: M256 Smith Hall, Box 353580
Phone: 543-7580
Email: jos23@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Arts & Humanities

Must register for this section for Honors credit.

Honors students required to complete a longer mid-term, and either a longer final exam or a 10-12 page paper.

Introduces important trends and movements in Russian literary and cultural history.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

ARCH 351 B: Romanesque, Gothic, And Renaissance Architecture (VLPA)

SLN 10340 (View UW registration info »)

Ann Huppert (Architecture; Art History)
Office: 208N Gould Hall, Box 355720
Phone: 206 685-8455
Email: ahuppert@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Additional Any

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT

You must register for both lecture (ARCH 351B) and section (BA). The Honors section will explore the "Networks and Flows of People and Materials and Ideas"

Honors students: please email uwhonors@uw.edu for an add code. If you have questions about the course, feel free to email instructor at: ahuppert@uw.edu

Additional $17 course fee.

Arch 351 is a 5-credit honors section that provides an opportunity for deeper exploration of the course content of Arch 351. Through readings, discussions and individual research, the section focuses on the networks and flows of people, materials, and ideas surrounding architecture and the built environment around the world in the period from about 700 to 1750.

Course Requirements The requirements are regular attendance and active participation at Friday section meetings and weekly lectures, completion of required readings, a mid-term and final exam (taken with Arch 351A), and a research project. Students will develop individual research papers and a digitally-based presentation centered on images and maps.

Learning Objectives • Understand how networks and exchange influenced world architectural developments in the medieval and early modern periods • Develop research and writing skills centered on architectural history • Expand knowledge of digital tools, including • Explore the place of imagery in understanding architecture

L ARCH 353: History Of Modern Landscape Architecture (VLPA / I&S)

SLN 16130 (View UW registration info »)

Thaisa Way (Architecture)
Office: 348F Gould Hall, Box 355734
Phone: 206 685-2523
Email: tway@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 5 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Arts & Humanities

H-Additional Any

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT

Second course in the L ARCH History series. CONTACT PROF. THAISA WAY, TWAY@UW.EDU with course questions and L ARCH adviser, Nick Dreher (ndreher@uw.edu), for add code.

The course investigates modernism, modernist theory, and the modern landscape architecture as process, product, and theory.
What makes a good urban landscape? A great public park? An inspiring work of landscape art? This course will explore the history of designing and creating gardens and landscapes in diverse cultures and
places as the profession and practice of landscape architecture has become a leading field in the design and creation of newly imagined city spaces and places. We will begin in the 19th century with Central Park, in New York City, one of the first public parks designed for the public and work our way up to the postindustrial parks and landscapes of the late 20th century. We will study small gardens that inspire the poet and large nature preserves, as well as city plazas, corporate roof gardens,
and the neighborhood park.

We will explore how modern art and architecture influence landscape design and in turn how environmental thinking influenced the push for sustainable cities. What does it mean to be modern? How does creativity shape the design of natural landscapes? This course provides an historic and critical overview of the evolution of modernism and modernist designs in terms of aesthetic, technological, social, and spiritual concerns in the built landscape. Moving between practice and theory, between design, as a creative art and as a way of thinking, we will consider diverse modernisms across the Americas and Europe.

H-Science (13)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the "HONORS" prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 221 A: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW)

SLN 15345 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:
-Why are women and men different?
-Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
-Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
-When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
-What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

-Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
-Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
-Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
-Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 221 B: Evolution and Human Behavior (NW)

SLN 15346 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:
-Why are women and men different?
-Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
-Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
-When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
-What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

-Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
-Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
-Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
-Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

HONORS 221 C: Game Theory and Its Applications (NW)

SLN 15347 (View UW registration info »)

Jacob Cooper (Biology)
Phone: 510-852-4504
Email: yankel@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

In game theory, a "game" is any interaction in which decisions must be made. Penalty kicks in soccer. Nuclear disarmament. Predator-prey behaviors. Hostage negotiation. Voting coalitions. Auction bidding. Insurance pricing. Cooperative hunting. Fish schooling. Political collusion. Information sharing. And on and on and on.

Game theory is a math toolkit used to analyze games. It's a way to formalize games, to think about their strategies, their dynamics, and the expected actions of others. Game theory is the study of how we do -- and do not -- get along.

While many game theory courses focus on the mathematical formalism of games, this course will focus on its applications. Because "games" are found in biology, economics, politics, and philosophy, and because game theory itself is mathematical, this course is interdisciplinary.

In this course, students will:
- learn game theoretic concepts like "actors", "decisions", "strategies", "information", "payoffs", "equilibria", and "rationality"
- learn how to formalize games in extensive and strategic form
- practice formalizing biological, economical, and political games
- learn to solve games (according to the criteria they have decided is most important)
- practice thinking probabilistically, both in games (eg, Bayesian games) and in strategies (eg, mixed equilibria)
- practice the full process of (1) translating real-world problems into math, (2) solving the math, and (3) translating the solution back into real-world strategies
- discuss the assumptions and limitations of the above process
- identify "games" in their own lives, and apply game theory to those games

HONORS 221 D: Climate Extremes (NW)

SLN 15348 (View UW registration info »)

Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
Phone: 206-543-8474
Email: paulj@uw.edu
Alex Gagnon
Office: 409 OSB
Phone: (206) 543-5627
Email: gagnon@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Natural Science

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT
To better understand the key factors that control the earth's present and future climate, this course examines episodes in the earth's past when extreme climate conditions existed. Dramatic changes in the earth's climate have resulted from natural variations in solar insolation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, rates and pathways of ocean circulation, plate tectonics, and the evolution of vascular plants and, in modern times, the burning of fossil fuels. The impact of these factors on climate through interactions between the atmosphere, oceans and land will be evaluated. Using these lessons from the past, students will learn what currently controls climate on our planet and why dramatic climate changes occur.

The processes that produced past climate changes will be discussed primarily as a framework to evaluate modern and future climate change resulting from human activity.

The class will utilize lectures, in-class problem solving, discussion of scientific papers and weekly homework to learn the material on both a qualitative and quantitative level. Students are expected to have had sufficient science-based coursework to feel comfortable solving quantitative in-class and homework problems using basic algebra and, in some cases, using the spreadsheet program Excel.

Honors students will work on a choice of two types of projects. They can conduct individual literature research on a specific climate topic. The result of this individual research will be a succinct summary of a complex climate issue written for a general audience, in the form of a "letter to the editor" which they will contribute to a media source, including regional newspapers. Alternatively, they will write an explanatory article on some as yet uncovered feature of climate change and contribute it to Wikipedia.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOCHEM 451 H: Honors Biochem (NW)

SLN 11328 (View UW registration info »)

David Morris (Biochemistry)
Office: J-367 Health Sciences, Box 357350
Phone: 206 543-1694
Email: dmorris@uw.edu
Alan Weiner (Biochemistry)
Email: amweiner@uw.edu

Credits: 4
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Minimum of a 3.0 in BIOC 450 or 3.5 in BIOC 440
BIOC 451 is the honors version of BIOC 441; it covers the same topics in metabolism and gene expression using the same textbook, but is taught as a group discussion of selected publications from the primary literature, with an emphasis on research strategy, experimental design, creative thinking, and scientific communication.

CHEM 155: Honors General Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12164 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 72 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Add codes available through Chemistry dept @ BAG 303

Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 336: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)

SLN 12301 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4
Limit: 72 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Add codes available through Chemistry dept. MUST REGISTER FOR LECTURE AND QUIZ SECTION AA.
Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.
For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

CHEM 346: Organic Chemistry Honors Laboratory (NW)

SLN 12302 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 3
Limit: 24 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

UW General Elective

Add codes available through Chemistry dept @ BAG 303.
Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.
To accompany CHEM 336. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 241, CHEM 346 (3 credits).

CSE 142: Computer Programming I (NW)

SLN ?

Stuart Reges (CSE)
Office: CSE 552
Phone: 206-685-9138
Email: reges@uw.edu

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Contact/Visit CSE Advising to Register
To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. corresponding CSE 390 H section

See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

CSE 143: Computer Programming II (NW)

SLN ?

Stuart Reges (CSE)
Office: CSE 552
Phone: 206-685-9138
Email: reges@uw.edu

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Contact CSE Advising to Register
To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 142 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. corresponding CSE 390 H section

See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

MATH 135: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)

SLN 16993 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
Students must have completed or be in Honors MATH 134.
Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 335: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NW)

SLN 17076 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 40 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 334.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 122 B: Honors Electromagnetism (NW)

SLN 19032 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 66 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Natural Science

H-Additional Any

HONORS STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THE HONORS SECTION AND ASSOCIATED QUIZ SECTION TO RECEIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

Prerequisite: either MATH 125 or MATH 134, which may be taken concurrently; PHYS 121.
See Physics department for more info.

Covers the basic principles of electromagnetism and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 115 and PHYS 122.

H-Social Sciences (2)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Additional Any requirement. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the "HONORS" prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 231 A: Bull of Heaven and Earth: Animal-Human Relations from Paleolithic Cave Art to the Chicago Stockyards (I&S)

SLN 15349 (View UW registration info »)

Joel Walker (History)
Office: Smith Hall, Room 004, Box 353560
Phone: 616-1972
Email: jwalker@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

No animal has had a greater impact on world history than the cow. This course employs the history of cattle as a lens to investigate broad patterns in human-animal interaction from the Paleolithic era until today. Our principal goal is to gain insight into the conception and treatment of animals in diverse cultural settings. To keep the topic manageable, we will focus on cattle and related bovine species, but you are welcome to write about other species and themes for your final paper. The assigned readings range widely across world history, including the Ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman world, India, East Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

HONORS 231 B: The History of the Social Sciences (I&S)

SLN 15350 (View UW registration info »)

Daniel Bessner (Jackson School of International Studies)
Phone: (206) 685-1043
Email: dbessner@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Social Science

H-Social Science

This course explores the history of the social sciences from their advent in the late nineteenth century until today, with a focus on the twentieth century. Social sciences examined include economics, psychology, history, sociology, and anthropology. Students will read a series of classic texts by intellectuals such as Max Weber, Sigmund Freud, Clifford Geertz, and others, and will learn how to place these texts in their larger political, social, and cultural contexts. By the course's end, students will have a familiarity with the history, trends, and theories that have shaped modern social science. N.B.: This course focuses on texts that adopt non-quantitative and non-formal methodologies.

H-Interdisciplinary (5)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Additional Any requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. For students completing the 2015 core curriculum, any course without the "HONORS" prefix may only count for your Additional Any requirement. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Prison Logics and Abolition Futures (C, DIV)

SLN 15354 (View UW registration info »)

William McKeithen (Geography)
Email: wmck@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

In the United States today, more than 2.3 million people are living in prison. More than 324 million are living in a prison society. In this course, we will study both - the prison and the US prison society - to ask how did we get here? what does this mean for everyday life? and how might we create alternatives beyond the prison? This course focuses on mass incarceration in the US, but also interrogates the complex and transnational forces that underpin and undermine this reality - social control, power relations, cultural politics, resistance, and hope. Together we will engage this study through a mixture of classroom dialogue, multi-genre writing and peer review, and in-class and out-of-class activities that will ask you to consider your own place in relation to the prison. Drawing on a wide range of materials - evidence-based research, prisoner memoir, government policy, architectural design, social theory, activism, and science fiction - this course will ask you to consider what you think about prisons and how prisons became thinkable.

HONORS 391 A: Alter/Native Ethnography (VLPA / I&S / NW, DIV)

SLN 15355 (View UW registration info »)

Rachel Chapman (Anthropology)
Email: rrc4@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

What is Alter/Native Anthropology? Alter/Native is a concept in search of a definition. That is part of our work for the quarter. The term Alter/Native Anthropology comes from the much-debated concept "native anthropology." Native Anthropology refers to the spectrum of ideas, insights and projects of individuals and groups engaged in the study of their own "home" - the place or places from which they claim to originate, or in which, because of an intimate connection, they might be considered or consider themselves "insider," "indigenous" or "native." In its original conceptualization, native anthropologists was used to refer to people whose "home" has been the site of oppressive power relations and struggles, coercion, violence and exploitation, people whose societies, communities or cultures were the targets of colonial domination and the objects of anthropological inquiry, not the subjects or anthropologists.

Today we suspect that the dichotomy between native and anthropologist is fundamentally flawed. As "hybridization of cultures, languages and media becomes the rule, any notion of purity has disappeared" (Halleck and Magnan 1993:161), and the boundaries between observer and observed, oppressed and oppressor are known to be blurred, overlapping, mutually constituting, shifting and variable over time and space. Yet there is still a critical need to examine the theoretical, epistemological and practical contributions of the "counter-discourses", the "narratives from the borderlands" of alternative historical voices.

HONORS 391 B: Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism (VLPA / I&S / NW)

SLN 15356 (View UW registration info »)

Robert Pavia (School of Marine Affairs)
Office: 3707 Brooklyn Avenue NE, Box 359485
Phone: 206 502-5243
Email: bobpavia@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

This course explores climate change science Interwoven with discussions of how Arctic states are being affected by climate change. Arctic indigenous peoples are working with Arctic states to engage in the climate change discussion. The course consider the impacts of climate change to nations and people and also how on literature, music, art impact science and activism.

HONORS 394 A: Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity (VLPA / I&S)

SLN 15357 (View UW registration info »)

Catherine Connors (Classics)
Office: Condon 306, Box 353110
Phone: 543-2266
Email: cconnors@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

In this course we shall read and discuss ancient sources on religion, philosophy, medicine and law, along with modern scholarly analyses of ancient society, to explore the roles of women in ancient Greek and Roman society. Readings are chosen and discussions are structured with the aim of developing three types of awareness:
historical awareness --knowledge of basic historical realities of women and of family life, limitations and biases of surviving evidence, how different Greece and Rome are from each other, and from now; a sense of how political institutions can intervene in family relations
critical awareness -- an understanding of the history of changing interpretations of the ancient world -- how what people see in ancient Greece or Rome can also articulate what they value in their own cultures
self-awareness -- a sensitivity to the forces (laws, customs, stereotypes, images and more) shaping our own social relations.

HONORS 394 B: Exploring the Power of Music (VLPA / I&S)

SLN 22015 (View UW registration info »)

Deborah Pierce (Education Librarian)
Phone: 206 543-4425
Email: dpierce@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 15 students

Honors Credit Type

H-Interdisciplinary

H-Interdisciplinary

Music can be heard all over our planet. It finds its place in the chants of a shaman healing their patient, accompanies television commercials to help sell a product, helps create an atmosphere at social events, and accompanies societal rites of passage. Its inspiration can also be found in nature, for example, as a bird singing in our back yard or in the Amazon rainforest. Academically, music weaves its magic into many fields, making it an interdisciplinary powerhouse. It is present from the hard sciences through the most esoteric arts. Examples include recording technology in engineering; the use of music for healing in medicine and psychology; the study of sound production and building of musical instruments in physics; copyright and performance rights in law; and its use as a teaching aid in education.

In this experiential course we will examine some of the universal themes emerging from the use of music and its influence on humanity and our world. Our ten week journey will utilize various lenses through which we will explore the topic, including scientific and academic research, observation of collective human experience, and your own personal experience both in and outside of class. Our time together will be partially modeled on the goals and objectives of collaborative teaching/learning communities. Activities will include class visits from guest experts and group and individual research opportunities along with weekly musical explorations facilitated by the instructor. During this process we will also examine how it affects and empowers our own lives.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 496 A: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15361 (View UW registration info »)

Julie Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS 100/496

HONORS 100/496

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

In this capstone course, a portfolio studio, students will complete the Interdisciplinary or College Honors Program by creating educational narratives within vibrant, creative, online portfolios. Each student will reflect upon the intersection of formal coursework and experiential learning by exploring, collaborating, articulating, testing out, refining, and showcasing the Honors portfolio to a community of peers and mentors.

Using portfolio platforms introduced in Honors 100, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across their UW courses and disciplines, as well as to consider in-classroom knowledge and its interface with academia and experiences outside of the classroom.

HONORS 496 B: Integration of the Honors Curriculum

SLN 15362 (View UW registration info »)

Julie Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

HONORS 100/496

HONORS 100/496

For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6 of 9 Honors Core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning projects.

To request an add code, please submit this form:
http://tinyurl.com/honors496 (students who are graduating this year will get priority)

Here in Honors I coordinate the curriculum and recruit faculty from across campus and within the local and international communities. I am also lead in coordinating & managing international programs in Honors, so I develop (and teach!) study abroad programs. I also teach Honors 496, and am affiliate faculty in the English Department.

Special Topics (3)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 397 A: Human/Transhuman/Posthuman (I&S)

SLN 15358 (View UW registration info »)

John (Jack) Whelan (Foster School of Business)
Email: jwhelan@uw.edu

Credits: 2, c/nc
Limit: 15 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

UW General Elective

The Western humanist tradition has presupposed the existence of the individual free Subject. Such a notion has been under attack by post-structuralist and Posthumanist thought with wide-ranging implications for political discourse and shaping contemporary ideas about human identity. This seminar will seek to understand the evolution of ideas about what it means to be human from secular rationalist and anti-rationalist perspectives as well as from Western and non-Western religious perspectives.

In a weekly, two-hour seminar format, the course will give students the opportunity to engage with the work of a wide variety of thinkers and artists so that they might become acquainted with the dynamic cultural landscape that is profoundly changing what it means to be human.

The themes for each week are listed below. The instructor will provide background information and resources to acquaint students with the different perspectives they will encounter, but the main goal of the course is to provide an opportunity for lively discussion around a topic that is of central concern for all thoughtful human beings: What do you think it means to be human?

Week 1: Overview of Course Goals: Our Postmodern Condition
Week 2. Deconstructing the Self 1: From Nietzsche to the Post-Nietzschean Anti-humanists.
Week 3: Deconstructing the Self 2: Buddhist and other Non-Western Perspectives
Week 4: Personalist Humanism: From the Renaissance to the Romantics
Week 5. The Rationalist Project: From Enlightenment Humanism to Technological
Transhumanism
Week 6. The Disenchantment with Rationality: The Poststructuralist Critique of the Enlightenment
Project.
Week 7: Religious Humanism: From Kierkegaard to Buber and Beyond
Week 8: Eschaton as Upload: The Body, Gnosticism, and the Posthuman
Week 9: The Human Social-Political Future: Markets, Marx, or Something Else?
Week 10: Wrap

HONORS 397 B: Personal Genomics and Personal Identity (I&S, DIV)

SLN 15359 (View UW registration info »)

Jon Herron (Biology)
Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
Phone: (206) 547-6330
Email: herronjc@uw.edu
Moon Draper (Biology)
Email: mdraper@uw.edu
Julie Villegas (Honors Program; English)
Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
Phone: 206-543-7172
Email: villegas@uw.edu

Credits: 2, c/nc
Limit: 12 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

UW General Elective

Our country is in the midst of a national conversation about genomics,
ancestry, and identity. In this seminar, we will offer the opportunity
to explore issues raised by this conversation in a collegial and
collaborative setting. Readings and conversations will cover topics
ranging from personal identity in a social and political context to
human health and evolution in the context of genetics.

HONORS 398 A: Experiencing Music (VLPA)

SLN 15360 (View UW registration info »)

Claudia Jensen (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Phone: 206-543-6848
Email: cjensen@uw.edu
Ileana Marin (Comparative History of Ideas; Comparative Literature)
Phone: 206 632-9865
Email: marini@uw.edu

Credits: 3, c/nc
Limit: 25 students

Credit Type

UW General Elective

UW General Elective

Students will purchase the Symphony's Campus Card ($30); all ticket arrangements will be made by the instructors. Questions? Contact Claudia Jensen (cjensen@uw.edu).
Join us at the Seattle Symphony for the class "Experiencing Music"! No musical training is necessary - just bring your curiosity and your willingness to engage in the communal experience of live music at the highest level. All students are welcome to sign up for Honors 398. We will be going to five concerts at Benaroya Hall throughout the quarter on the following evenings (all on Thursdays except Feb. 22, a screening of the film "Amadeus" with live music!): planned dates are Jan. 17, 31; Feb. 14, 22, 28. We'll prepare for these concerts through discussions and readings in classes held on campus, we'll have talks given by Symphony staff, and we'll go on a backstage tour. Students will purchase the Symphony's Campus Card ($30); all ticket arrangements will be made by the instructors. Questions? Contact Claudia Jensen (cjensen@uw.edu).