Honors Course Archive

Course Archive for Autumn 2023

* Add codes are placed on all courses one week after the first day of the quarter. If you need an add code, please email the course instructor for permission, and once approved, forward the confirmation from your instructor to uwhonors@uw.edu. We will be in touch with registration details as soon as possible.

Honors Arts & Humanities (4)

Arts & Humanities courses may only count for your H-Arts & Humanities requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 210 A: Empire and the Poesis of Place (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 210 A: Empire and the Poesis of Place (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 16345 (View UW registration info »)

Gillian Harkins (English)
Email: gharkins@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

“Language, of course, is constantly being redefined, not just by demagogues, but by people who employ it. Language is we realized. Each word has passed mouth by mouth over the centuries, changed by intonation and accent, changed by wit and utility.” 

—  Solmaz Sharif, “A Poetry of Proximity” (Kenyon Review 2022).

This Honors Seminar will explore post-1988 literary and cultural works about the imperial geographies and spatial imaginaries of the United States. The year 1968 marked a turning point in struggles to transform existing world orders, with the U.S. as one central site of contestation over radical redistributions of space, wealth and power. Fast-forward to 1988: the closing of the Cold War once again promised global transformations in distributions of space, wealth and power.  What was the role of the U.S. in this post-1988 period?  How did longer-standing practices of U.S. settler colonialism, racial capitalism, and imperialism relate to the emerging realities of the approaching millenium?  And why might we turn to literary and cultural works to explore the complex and still-unfinished answers to these questions?

This course proposes that literary and cultural works offer a rich archive for exploring some of the key questions of this period. These works draw attention to the changing ways space, wealth and power are imagined, symbolized, narrated, and materialized, often allowing their audiences to perceive and conceive reality in new ways.  Together we will read a series of critical, literary and cultural works that focus in particular on the “poesis of place,” or how place is seemingly brought into being, in relation to the post-1988 U.S.  Through our readings and discussions, we will explore how language conjures and contests the proximities through which “we” enacts place.

Our reading is not decided yet, will likely select from works by Rabih Alameddine, Zaina Alsous, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Lawrence Chua, Louise Erdrich, Renee Gladman, Kazuo Ishiguro, N.K. Jemisin, Jamaica Kincaid, Solmaz Sharif, Colson Whitehead, Karen Tei Yamashita.

Assignments for the class will focus on engaging these works in class discussion and in weekly short written reflections.  A final project will offer critical and creative options.

HONORS 210 B: Aristotle's Concept of The Tragic in Theory and Practice (A&H, W)

HONORS 210 B: Aristotle's Concept of The Tragic in Theory and Practice (A&H, W)

SLN 16346 (View UW registration info »)

James Clauss (Classics)
Email: jjc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

15 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Office hours: by appointment after class or other times by zoom

For millennia, Aristotle’s definition of Tragedy as preserved in his treatise Poetics influenced theoreticians and literary artists. In Honors 210 B, we will reexamine this definition as part of his broader theory of mimetic art and his scientific approach to literature. Thereafter we will read plays, Classical and post-Classical, applying this definition as a way of critiquing it and perhaps coming to our own understanding of what “The Tragic” is not only on the stage but in life. The final project will involve the creation of a real or hypothetical dramatic project in which students incorporate their own reactions to Aristotle’s definition; that is, students will describe the “tragedy” that they would write in the wake of our readings and discussions. It is not necessary to write a play, but rather a description of the one that they might imagine producing.

I am still working out details of the course, but for now we will proceed as follows: After two sessions unpacking Poetics, we’ll read four ancient Greek plays (see schedule below) after which we’ll dedicate a class to reflecting on “The Tragic” seen in these plays. Then we will look at four post-Classical plays followed by a class dedicated to reflecting on “The Tragic” in these plays. In the first of two workshops, students will come to class with preliminary ideas about the tragedy they would write and discuss with each other in small groups in order to get productive feedback in preparation for a second workshop in the final week of class. In weeks 8 and 9 we will look at four new plays (not as yet determined) and Fellini’s film The Nights of Cabiria. This will be followed by our third reflection on “The Tragic” in these plays and the film. The hope is that these reflections will provide greater insight into a student’s personal take on the concept of “The Tragic.” In the final week, there will be the second workshop with students again meeting in class in small groups to move the final project forward for submission no later than Friday of Exam Week. During the last day of class there will be a general discussion about what was learned in the course.

There are no exams. Grades will be determined on the basis of participation in class (40%) and the final project (60%)

HONORS 210 C: Library Mashup: Reframing and Remixing Archives (A&H, DIV, W)

HONORS 210 C: Library Mashup: Reframing and Remixing Archives (A&H, DIV, W)

SLN 16347 (View UW registration info »)

John Vallier (Ethnomusicology; Libraries)
Office: Suzzallo Library 370A, Box 352900
Phone: 206 616-1210
Email: vallier@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

10 spots reserved for incoming honors students.

Remixes have emerged as one of today’s most popular modes of expression. From DJ Spooky’s “Rebirth of a Nation” to the ceaseless onslaught of TikTok mashups, remixes have the power to convey a multiplicity of meanings. This class will use the practice of remix as a foil to explore, interpret, and critique the world of archives and library special collections. Students will learn how to practically navigate the world of in-person archives, both on and off UW’s campus. As part of this process we will learn about archives’ history of colonial extraction, biased and racist description, and such issues as “archival silence.” Students will situate these explorations through literature in remix studies and present these critiques by way of remixing and reframing archival materials they discover. In addition to hands training in digital media editing and copyright law, we will trace the roots of remix to core concepts (e.g., imitatio and mimesis) and practices (e.g., film collage, plunderphonics, fan-vidding, dub, and hip hop).

HONORS 240 A: Russia's Big Books (A&H, W)

HONORS 240 A: Russia's Big Books (A&H, W)

SLN 16355 (View UW registration info »)

Jose Alaniz (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
Office: M256 Smith Hall, Box 353580
Phone: 543-7580
Email: jos23@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 10 students

Honors Credit Type

The Russia’s Big Books courses study one big/epic novel by the titans of Russian literature per quarter. Includes such novels as Tolstoy’s War and Peace and Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Goncharov’s Oblomov, Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, and Nabokov’s Ada. All readings are in English. 

Honors students will complete an extended midterm and complete additional final write-ups/papers. Reflective reports will also be an optional component for Honors students.

Honors Science (3)

Science courses may only count for your H-Science requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NSc, W)

HONORS 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NSc, W)

SLN 16348 (View UW registration info »)

Oliver Fraser (Astronomy)
Office: PAB C324, Box 351580
Email: ojf@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

5 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Storytelling is ancient, effective, and satisfying, but using stories to communicate the nuances and ambiguities of science can be a challenge. In this course students will craft presentations that reflect their personal interests in nature and science, and in doing so they will learn how to effectively explain their own work, helping them develop into experts in their field. The class is centered around two presentations of a scientific nature, as well as a mythic storytelling assignment intended to develop storytelling skills. You will work closely in small groups to develop your presentation, delivered on days set aside for this purpose.

HONORS 220 B: Using Data Science to Fight Racism: Analyzing and Recreating the Visualizations of W.E.B. Du Bois (NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 220 B: Using Data Science to Fight Racism: Analyzing and Recreating the Visualizations of W.E.B. Du Bois (NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16349 (View UW registration info »)

Robin Angotti (UWB: School of Stem, Division of Engineering and Mathematics)
Email: riderr@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

10 spots reserved for incoming honors students

Data visualization is a method for communicating complex information in a form that makes the underlying data accessible and understandable. Used in every industry from nonprofits to business and from government entities to healthcare, the ability to analyze and create visualizations of complex data is an essential skill for success in today’s world.  Some of the most powerful examples of data visualization were made by a team of black sociologists led by W.E.B. Du Bois, only 37 years after the end of slavery in the United States.  In this course, we will analyze and recreate the visualizations of the Du Bois team as well as create corresponding visualizations with modern data with the potential to make new insights, to raise new questions, and to take positive action.

HONORS 220 C: Science, Technology, and Inequality: A Critical Examination of Race and Gender (NSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 220 C: Science, Technology, and Inequality: A Critical Examination of Race and Gender (NSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16350 (View UW registration info »)

Kessie Alexandre (Geography)
Email: kalexan@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

This course examines how scientific expertise and biotechnical interventions reproduce structures of inequality. Drawing primarily from antiracist and feminist approaches to science and technology studies, students will chart how race and gender are constructed through our scientific understanding of the body and how scientific categories have historically been used to justify and reproduce inequality. In this course, we will also discuss how marginalized groups have reimagined collective identities and resisted bodily violence and premature death.

Honors Social Sciences (4)

Social Science courses may only count for your H-Social Sciences requirement or your Honors Electives requirement.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (SSc, W)

HONORS 230 A: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (SSc, W)

SLN 16351 (View UW registration info »)

Roger Soder (Education)
Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
Email: rsoder@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

15 seats reserved for incoming Honors students.

We will consider the following five propositions for the conduct of good (i.e., ethical and effective) leadership:

1. Leadership involves at its base the creation of a persuaded audience; but beyond that, leadership involves creating and sustaining a more thoughtful public, a public capable of rising above itself.

2. A more thoughtful public must not only be created and sustained, but, given that things inevitably fall apart, must be recovered and reconstituted.

3. Leadership always has a political context; leadership in a democracy is necessarily different than leadership in other kinds of political regimes.

4. Leadership always involves assumptions (tacit and acknowledged) about human nature.

5. In a free political regime, assuming free and fair elections, we get the kinds of leaders we deserve and we must consider how to behave in ways to deserve the kinds of leaders we say we want.

 

Sources of texts will include Tocqueville, Orwell, Machiavelli, Bacon, Dostoevsky, and Sophocles, as well as contemporary authors. Method of instruction: close reading of texts, coupled with fifteen 1-2 page single-spaced papers on texts, plus a longer (approximately 6,500 words) synthesis paper; small and large group discussions with each other, two lectures, and a visiting scholars/practitioner. 

Professor Soder is glad to talk with you further about any aspect of the course, please reach him via email: rsoder@uw.edu

HONORS 230 B: Safety-Net Hospitals in the US: Past, Present, and Future (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 230 B: Safety-Net Hospitals in the US: Past, Present, and Future (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16352 (View UW registration info »)

Maralyssa Bann (UW Medicine)
Email: mbann@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Honors students.
The care of patients who are uninsured or underinsured is not evenly distributed across US hospitals – institutions that proportionally provide more of this care are referred to as “safety-net hospitals.” Why has this arisen and what are the implications? This course will use the study of safety-net hospitals to examine broader issues of equity and justice in our healthcare system and society at large. We will trace from historical beginnings to understand how safety-net hospitals have been shaped by key organizational, policy, and funding mechanisms and will analyze how major pieces of legislation such as the Affordable Care Act affect their function. We will also explore the overlapping issues of inequitable access to care, disparities in health outcomes, and systems of oppression such as structural racism as we assess the impact and success of safety-net hospitals. Finally, we will consider several current and upcoming challenges for safety-net hospitals including major funding shifts to value-based payment strategies as well as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and recovery. Students will come away from this course with deep understanding of safety-net hospitals but also of the context of the overall systems in which they function. No previous knowledge or coursework is necessary for this class.
 

HONORS 230 C: International Human Rights Advocacy (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 230 C: International Human Rights Advocacy (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16353 (View UW registration info »)

Megan McCloskey (Law School; Law Societies and Justice)
Email: meganmc@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 35 students

Honors Credit Type

10 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Some exposure to human rights would be welcome but not required. Courses which would be recommended would include LSJ 320, 321 and/or 346.

The course will cover the basics of the international human rights system including various monitoring and enforcement strategies advocates use in different fora, and engage in applied learning. Students will have the opportunity to meet (virtually) with human rights advocates around the world who are working in the areas of gender equality, protection of refugees and displaced persons, and prevention of disability discrimination. Many of the speakers will be engaged in intersectional work to advance rights for persons who hold multiple and complex identities, such as indigenous women with disabilities. One of the objectives of the course will be to encourage students to consider the many ways in which advocates engage human rights discourses to improve the lives of people in their communities and to gain new appreciation for the mechanisms through which human rights law is monitored and implemented at the international and national level. Students will have the opportunity to put what they learn into practice and engage in research projects to support the work of the human rights advocates with whom we meet.

HONORS 230 E: Revolutionary Genders in the Middle East (SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 230 E: Revolutionary Genders in the Middle East (SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 23606 (View UW registration info »)

Mediha Sorma (Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies)
Email: med1985@uw.edu

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Examines varying configurations of gender and sexuality in the Middle East that disturb race and class hierarchies, policing and state-building, and modern citizenship. Course materials challenge dominant depictions of gender in the region that cast women and non-normative bodies as victims of Islam, demonstrating the substantial role of these social actors in making and sustaining radical social movements and revolutionary times, such as the Arab Spring. Areas of inquiry include nationalism, colonialism, intimacy, reproduction, migration, militancy, resistance, and the politics of culture.

Honors Interdisciplinary (7)

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors requirement or your Honors Electives requirement. These courses cannot count for your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Inquiry designation.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 345 A: Oral History: Immigrants from the Middle East (C, DIV)

HONORS 345 A: Oral History: Immigrants from the Middle East (C, DIV)

SLN 16358 (View UW registration info »)

Melike Yucel Koc (Near Eastern Languages and Civilization)
Office: Denny M 220F
Email: yucelm@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Honors students.

Counts for Honors electives and UW Composition Requirement. Student must be registered for Honors specific section.

This course will provide students with the foundations for designing and executing oral history research projects. Students will read and discuss the literature about oral history theory and methods. Students will undertake independent fieldwork that will allow them to apply the method and approaches studied in class. Field interviews will be someone from the Middle Eastern immigrant communities in PNW.
 

HONORS 391 A: The Art of Understanding Science (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

HONORS 391 A: The Art of Understanding Science (A&H / SSc / NSc, W)

SLN 16359 (View UW registration info »)

KC Cole (Physics)
Email: kc314@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 28 students

Honors Credit Type

8 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Playwrights, poets, philosophers, filmmakers, sculptors and novelists all use the cosmos as their inspiration and subject matter; scientists themselves have worked in all of these genres in their efforts to communicate with the general public, and also with each other. The class will explore each of these forms, focusing on ideas from physics, math, evolutionary biology and computer science. Students will write reflections based on readings and viewings for each class; they will produce a final project to be presented to their fellow students: a short story, play, extended essay, visual art project, poem. The scientific content must be accurate and deepen our understanding of the subject matter, providing original insights. Students will be encouraged to work in groups and to lead class discussions.

 

HONORS 392 A: Political Ecology of Death in the Anthropocene (SSc / NSc, W)

HONORS 392 A: Political Ecology of Death in the Anthropocene (SSc / NSc, W)

SLN 23739 (View UW registration info »)

Karen Litfin (Political Science)
Office: 33 Gowen, Box 353530
Phone: (206) 685-3694
Email: litfin@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 5 students

Honors Credit Type

Note: this course will be jointly listed with POL S 486.
Every living organism dies, as do ecosystems and species, thereby perpetuating the “circle of life.” One species, however, has developed the capacity to anticipate (and therefore dread) death and commandeer planetary life-support systems in service to its own growth. Humanity is now operating well outside the planetary boundaries that characterized the Holocene, the interglacial “sweet spot” during which civilization emerged. The implications are profound: not only are we facing the end of “nature” as something separate from human culture, we are also facing the possibility of civilizational death.  

We therefore ask ourselves: what are the political and ecological consequences of how individuals and societies approach death? While death is a fact of life, questions of who lives, who dies, who decides, and with what consequences are also political ones. Our discussion will therefore be informed by themes of justice, equity, power and authority, and political agency. At the same time, because mortality is also an intensely personal reality, we will deepen our self-inquiry through poetry, videos, contemplative practices, personal exploration, and political action.

 

HONORS 394 A: Lovework: an unfinished syllabus (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 A: Lovework: an unfinished syllabus (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16360 (View UW registration info »)

Jeanette Bushnell (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies)
Office: Padelford B110, Box 354345
Phone: 206 543-6900
Email: pembina@uw.edu
Gabriel Teodros (Comparative History of Ideas)
Email: gteodros@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 55 students

Honors Credit Type

10 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

Within an indigenous pedagogical format, this interactive class will be used as a space to do lovework and critically engage with notions of love, where our understandings of love have come from, and how we can proceed with a love consciousness. We will ponder and attempt to perceive how love is incorporated into our daily lives.

We will vision possible logic trajectories and frames of understandings in which love, or lack thereof, is included – both individually and societally. Musical, biological, philosophical, psychological, religious, political, cultural, artistic, linguistic, and social perspectives of love will be discussed. We will search for love knowledges and we will seek stories about love in our own lives. We will look at how love has been used in history and then, we will vision how love can be put into action as a force for creating our futures that include values of equity, anti-oppression, and positive changes within social institutions.

This course is intended to be an intervention into contemporary practices so that we can better understand our connections and relationships. It is an encouragement to act in ways that better respect ourselves, others, and our world.

Specific skills we will practice to enhance our perceptions, ponderings and critical thinking are: build community, work together, develop awareness, share ideas, listen, hear, read, write, speak, sing, find joy and humor, make connections, balance, foster wonder, respect, imagine, vision, strategize, tell stories, and practice self-love.

HONORS 394 B: Ethics Matters...Or Does It? (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

HONORS 394 B: Ethics Matters…Or Does It? (A&H / SSc, DIV, W)

SLN 16361 (View UW registration info »)

Mark Purcell (Urban Design and Planning)
Office: Gould 410F, Box 355740
Email: mpurcell@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 25 students

Honors Credit Type

5 spots reserved for incoming Honors students.

What is the right thing to do? What does it mean to be a good person? Humans have been asking such ethical and moral questions for millennia, and they have come up with some answers. This course is an opportunity for you to read, understand, and critically evaluate many of those answers, from Aristotle’s Virtue Ethics, to Kant’s Deontology, to Nel Noddings’ ethics of care, to Gloria Anzaldua’s queer mestiza, and a whole lot in between. We will seek to understand, together, what these great thinkers have argued, what we think of their argument, and how we can use their arguments as an invaluable resource in our own ethical decision-making today.

HONORS 394 C: Could ChatGPT teach this class? Exploring the ethical implications of AI (A&H / SSc, W)

HONORS 394 C: Could ChatGPT teach this class? Exploring the ethical implications of AI (A&H / SSc, W)

SLN 23522 (View UW registration info »)

Amy Piedalue (Geography)
Email: amer@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 30 students

Honors Credit Type

ChatGPT could not teach this course…or rather, it should not. But that doesn’t mean that we don’t have a lot to learn from and about artificial intelligence (AI) and generative AI like ChatGPT. The recent explosion of genAI apps and platforms is of course not the beginning, or the end, of the diffusion of AI into our daily lives. Nor are the public debates surrounding the development and public release of this technology ‘new’ exactly. In fact, AI and machine learning (ML) are ubiquitous elements of our 21st century world – both in digital platforms and IRL. At times, it seems that the trajectory of AI development is outpacing the ability of global societies and citizens to both understand the technology and grapple with the ethical challenges it presents. Yet, we have also been actively debating many aspects of AI ethics for decades – in academic and policy circles, in news and public arenas, as well as through literary and cinematic explorations.

This course takes our current public discussions as a starting point for confronting the complexities of an AI-‘powered’ world. Beginning from some current debates – for example the impacts of genAI in the spheres of education and digital art – we will place these issues and concerns within the context of evolving fields of AI ethics, responsible AI, and AI policy. At the same time, we’ll consider the importance of key concepts from critical social theory (i.e. feminist, critical race, post-colonial, and queer theory) as tools to think critically about difference, inequality and social control. We will read, watch, and listen to a variety of materials – from news articles and policy papers, to academic research and TedTalks, to podcasts and documentaries. The course also includes a unit exploring AI ethics through fictional representations of AI. Across these sources and our class discussions, we will consider many questions, including: How do we weigh the potential benefits of AI against the potential risks and harms that AI magnifies, accelerates, or introduces? What is new and what’s familiar about the power dynamics surrounding the development and deployment of AI systems? What is the current state of AI awareness/AI literacy? How can regulations around data privacy and AI help to prevent harm and protect individual rights?

The course will be discussion driven and students will be expected to be actively engaged in classroom & online discussion spaces.

HONORS 394 D: The Idea of the University - Ways of Learning, Exploring, and Knowing (A&H / SSc, W)

HONORS 394 D: The Idea of the University – Ways of Learning, Exploring, and Knowing (A&H / SSc, W)

SLN 23604 (View UW registration info »)

Tony Lucero (International Studies, Comparative History of Ideas)
Phone: 206 616-1643
Email: jal26@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 10 students

Honors Credit Type

Is the University an agent of colonialism, capitalism, and the state? Alternatively, is it a crucible for social change and resistance? Is it all of these things? Can it be something else? This course examines the university as simultaneously a crime scene, a site for healing, and a place for transformation.

Find more information here.

HONORS 100/496 (2)

HONORS 100 must be taken the first autumn quarter you are admitted to Interdisciplinary Honors. Students may register for HONORS 496 after completing at least 6 of 9 Honors core courses and 1 of 2 Experiential Learning activities. See our requirements page for more details.

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 A: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16316 (View UW registration info »)

Nadra Fredj
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 140 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to: – Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do; – Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and – Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

HONORS 100 B: Introduction to Honors

SLN 16332 (View UW registration info »)

Nadra Fredj
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 1
Limit: 140 students

Honors Credit Type

Required for and restricted to first quarter Honors students only.

Students must also register for a section. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement. HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first quarter Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level. Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to: – Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do; – Meet a few alums and hear about their experiences in UW Honors and beyond; and – Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

Honors Electives (11)

Any course without the “HONORS” prefix may only count for your Honors Electives requirement. You will earn Areas of Inquiry credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.

Other Honors courses (without HONORS-prefix)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

BIOC 450 A: Honors Biochemistry (NSc)

SLN 11417 (View UW registration info »)

Credits:

Credit Type

Add Code required
PREREQ: 3.5 BIOL/CHEM GPA.

CONTACT ADVISERS@CHEM.WASHINGTON.EDU
TO ENROLL

For Biochemistry majors and molecular and cell biology majors. Core concepts in biochemistry, including protein structure, compartmentalization of reactions, thermodynamics and kinetics in a biological context, energy production, and regulation of metabolic pathways. HONORS BIOC covers the same topics as BIOC 440, but emphasizes group exercises and analysis of primary literature.

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12446 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either MATH 124 or MATH 134, either of which may be taken concurrently; score of 66% on HCHEMC placement test, score of 3, 4 or 5 on AP Chemistry exam, or IB score of 5, 6, or 7 on high level chemistry exam.

Students must also register for CHEM 145 AA, AB, AC, or AD.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

$75 course fee

CHEM 145 and CHEM 155 cover material in CHEM 142, CHEM 152, and CHEM 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 142, CHEM145 (5 credits); CHEM 145, CHEM 155, CHEM 162 (10 credits).

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NSc)

SLN 12446 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162.

To register, students must contact Chemistry Adviser at advisers@chem.washington.edu

For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course group: CHEM 221, CHEM 223, CHEM 237, CHEM 335.

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

CSE 122 / CSE 390 HA: Introduction to Computer Programming II (NSc)

SLN 13361 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 122 lecture A or B
2. corresponding CSE 122 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. the corresponding CSE 390 HA section

NOTE: CSE 390 MUST be taken concurrently with CSE 122 to have it count toward an Honors core requirement. You cannot take the two courses in separate quarters.

Computer programming for students with some previous programming experience. Emphasizes program design, style, and decomposition. Uses data structures (e.g., lists, dictionaries, sets) to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Introduces data abstraction and interface versus implementation. Recommended: CSE 121 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

CSE 123 / CSE 390 HB: Introduction to Computer Programming III (NSc)

SLN 13362 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 4+1

Honors Credit Type

CONTACT CSE (ugrad-adviser@cs.washington.edu.) with registration questions

To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
1. CSE 123 lecture
2. corresponding CSE 123 section
3. CSE 390 H
AND
4. CSE 390 HB

Computer programming for students with significant previous programming experience. Emphasizes implementation and run-time analysis of data structures and algorithms using techniques including linked references, recursion, and object-oriented inheritance to solve computational problems motivated by modern societal and scientific needs. Recommended: CSE 122 or completion of Paul G. Allen School’s Guided Self-Placement.

ENGL 182 K: Composition: Multimodal (C)

ENGL 182 K: Composition: Multimodal (C)

SLN 14764 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Counts for Honors electives and UW Composition Requirement. Student must be registered for Honors specific section.

Cannot be taken if student has already received a grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL 109/110, 111, 121, 131, or 182

Priority I & II Registration for incoming honors students. Fill out Honors Add Code and Course Override form to request add code.

Instructor:  MiSun Bishop, English

English 182 focuses on teaching strategies and skills for effective writing and argument that are required of traditional academic genres, such as the research essay, while also expanding the skills for composing in multimodal genres that our increasingly digital and media saturated world demands.

Section K is an Honors discussion driven class with minimal lecturing and grounded in a disability studies analytic.  Students will reflect on their own growth as scholars and their learning process as an evolving product. Honors students will write longer reflective papers with emphasis on metacognitive critical takeaways.

English 182K (Honors) syllabus

ENGL 282: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

ENGL 282: Honors Intermediate Multimodal Composition (C)

SLN 14822 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5
Limit: 23 students

Honors Credit Type

Add code required. Email uwhonors@uw.edu to request code

Intermediate Multimodal Composition:Strategies for composing effective multimodal texts for print, digital physical delivery, with focus on affordances of various modes–words, images, sound, design, and gesture–and genres to address specific rhetorical situations both within and beyond the academy. Although the course has no prerequisites, instructors assume knowledge of academic writing.

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (SSc)

LAW 100 H: Introduction to American Law (SSc)

SLN 17245 (View UW registration info »)

Theodore Myhre (School of Law)
Phone: 206-685-7914
Email: tmyhre@uw.edu

Credits: 5
Limit: 24 students

Honors Credit Type

5 seats reserved for incoming Freshmen.

Add code required to register. Email uwhonors@uw.edu for add code.

Students must register for the Honors section of this course in order to receive Honors Additional Any credit.

Examines the structure of the American legal system and how laws are made. Surveys key doctrinal areas of the law learning fundamental legal concepts, and explore how the law functions and evolves over time, including legal issues and decision-making related to statutory or common law.

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NSc)

SLN 18284 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

REGISTRATION INFORMATION AVAILABLE:
HTTPS://MATH.WASHINGTON.EDU/
REGISTRATION-INFORMATION#MATH134

Covers the material of MATH 124, MATH 125, MATH 126; MATH 307, MATH 308. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for MATH 124 after taking MATH 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

MATH 334 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus (NSc)

SLN 18366 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either minimum grade of 2.0 in MATH 136, or minimum grade of 3.0 in all MATH 126 and MATH 307 and MATH 308.

Please contact advising@math.washington.edu if you have questions about this course.

Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 300, MATH 309, MATH 324, MATH 327, MATH 328, and MATH 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

PHYS 141 B: Honors Physics Mechanics (NSc)

PHYS 141 B: Honors Physics Mechanics (NSc)

SLN 20618 (View UW registration info »)

Credits: 5

Honors Credit Type

Prerequisite: either a minimum grade of 2.5 in MATH 124, MATH 134, which may be taken concurrently, a minimum score of 4 on the AP Calculus AB exam, or a minimum score of 3 on the AP Calculus BC exam; recommended: high school-level physics course.

Addresses same material as PHYS 121 in more depth and with additional topics such as current research and cross-disciplinary applications. For students with strong calculus preparation. Maximum 5 credits allowed for any combination of PHYS 114, PHYS 117, PHYS 121, and PHYS 141. 

Special Topics (1)

Special Topics courses are between one and three credits and do not fulfill Interdisciplinary Honors requirements. They will award non-Honors UW elective credit and a great experience.

HONORS-prefix courses

HONORS 397 A: Peer Educator Seminar (SSc)

HONORS 397 A: Peer Educator Seminar (SSc)

SLN 16362 (View UW registration info »)

Nadra Fredj
Email: fredjn@uw.edu

Credits: 2
Limit: 25 students

Credit Type

For Peer Educators Only.